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How to Shrink Image to Fit on Screen (FX5200)



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 21st 05, 04:48 PM
Philadelphia Frank
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to Shrink Image to Fit on Screen (FX5200)

I feel really dumb asking this, but I can't figure out how to reduce
the size of my window to fit on the screen. The top (or the bottom)
doesn't show in the window. I don't have access to the menu bars and
the bottom task bar at the same time.

I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.

I'm using Nvidia driver 71.89.

Thank you for your time and help;
Frank
  #2  
Old July 21st 05, 07:44 PM
Phil Weldon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:

| I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
| image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.
|

_____

Likely your monitor needs setting to match the resolution and refresh rate
you have picked in 'Display Properties'. Timing changes (resolution and
refresh rates) affect the way the image is displayed on the monitor screen
(centering, size, sometimes even linearity.) Setting the monitor for image
position, size, and linearity requires using the controls ON THE MONITOR.

Phil Weldon

"Philadelphia Frank" wrote in message
...
I feel really dumb asking this, but I can't figure out how to reduce
the size of my window to fit on the screen. The top (or the bottom)
doesn't show in the window. I don't have access to the menu bars and
the bottom task bar at the same time.

I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.

I'm using Nvidia driver 71.89.

Thank you for your time and help;
Frank



  #3  
Old July 22nd 05, 12:13 AM
DaveW
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

You adjust the SIZE of the image with the MONITOR's front controls.

--
DaveW



"Philadelphia Frank" wrote in message
...
I feel really dumb asking this, but I can't figure out how to reduce
the size of my window to fit on the screen. The top (or the bottom)
doesn't show in the window. I don't have access to the menu bars and
the bottom task bar at the same time.

I can see how to change the resolution, and how to reposition the
image, but not how to shrink the window to fit on my monitor.

I'm using Nvidia driver 71.89.

Thank you for your time and help;
Frank



  #4  
Old July 22nd 05, 05:28 PM
Philadelphia Frank
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
adjust the screen image from the video card.

How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.

Frank
  #5  
Old July 22nd 05, 10:21 PM
Phil Weldon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
| the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
| adjust the screen image from the video card.

_____

Tough luck.

The adjustments MUST be done at the display device. Try reading the manual
for the 'big screen TV'. Look for adjustments for

*Horizontal Size
*Vertical Size
*Horizontal Centering
*Vertical Centering
*Linearity.

These adjustments may be inside the 'big screen TV' case. In that case you
should get a technician to make the adjustments.

The alternatives are

#1. set your display adapter to resolution and refresh rates that work with
your 'big screen TV'
#2. use a display device designed for use with a computer.

Phil Weldon


"Philadelphia Frank" wrote in message
...
My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
adjust the screen image from the video card.

How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.

Frank



  #6  
Old July 23rd 05, 02:35 PM
Philadelphia Frank
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you for the help. I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
I watch the screen resize and/or distort. I just hope I can't hurt
anything.

Frank

On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:21:00 GMT, "Phil Weldon"
wrote:

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
| the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
| adjust the screen image from the video card.

_____

Tough luck.

The adjustments MUST be done at the display device. Try reading the manual
for the 'big screen TV'. Look for adjustments for

*Horizontal Size
*Vertical Size
*Horizontal Centering
*Vertical Centering
*Linearity.

These adjustments may be inside the 'big screen TV' case. In that case you
should get a technician to make the adjustments.

The alternatives are

#1. set your display adapter to resolution and refresh rates that work with
your 'big screen TV'
#2. use a display device designed for use with a computer.

Phil Weldon


"Philadelphia Frank" wrote in message
.. .
My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
adjust the screen image from the video card.

How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.

Frank



  #7  
Old July 23rd 05, 07:26 PM
Phil Weldon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| I just hope I can't hurt anything.
_____

Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a CRT
based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something. Televisions are
not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and vertical rates. CRT
televisions have very high power horizontal drive circuits that also help
produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons toward the screen. Since
you don't have a profile registered for the TV you use, and since you are
using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the video card to horizontal rates
that the TV set can't handle, and that may cause damage. If you are lucky,
your TV will just reject harmful rates.

Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower frequency
cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video signal will
have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.

Phil Weldon


"Philadelphia Frank" wrote in message
...
Thank you for the help. I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
I watch the screen resize and/or distort. I just hope I can't hurt
anything.

Frank

On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:21:00 GMT, "Phil Weldon"
wrote:

'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
| the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
| adjust the screen image from the video card.

_____

Tough luck.

The adjustments MUST be done at the display device. Try reading the
manual
for the 'big screen TV'. Look for adjustments for

*Horizontal Size
*Vertical Size
*Horizontal Centering
*Vertical Centering
*Linearity.

These adjustments may be inside the 'big screen TV' case. In that case
you
should get a technician to make the adjustments.

The alternatives are

#1. set your display adapter to resolution and refresh rates that work
with
your 'big screen TV'
#2. use a display device designed for use with a computer.

Phil Weldon


"Philadelphia Frank" wrote in message
. ..
My monitor is actually a big screen TV. There isn't a way to adjust
the screen other than changing the aspect ratio. I need a way to
adjust the screen image from the video card.

How about Powerstrip? Will that do it.

Frank





  #8  
Old July 28th 05, 05:33 AM
Robert Hancock
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Phil Weldon wrote:
'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| I just hope I can't hurt anything.
_____

Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a CRT
based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something. Televisions are
not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and vertical rates. CRT
televisions have very high power horizontal drive circuits that also help
produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons toward the screen. Since
you don't have a profile registered for the TV you use, and since you are
using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the video card to horizontal rates
that the TV set can't handle, and that may cause damage. If you are lucky,
your TV will just reject harmful rates.

Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower frequency
cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video signal will
have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.


Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not
be possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on
the TV out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever
standard the TV uses).

--
Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
To email, remove "nospam" from
Home Page:
http://www.roberthancock.com/
  #9  
Old July 28th 05, 06:10 AM
Phil Weldon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

'Robert Hancock' wrote:
| Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not
| be possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on
| the TV out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever
| standard the TV uses).
_____

Except that 'Philadelphia Frank' posted
"I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
I watch the screen resize and/or distort."

Don't you think that is a pretty good indication that the horizontal and
vertical scan rates ARE changing, and the output being used is NOT
composite?

Phil Weldon


"Robert Hancock" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Phil Weldon wrote:
'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| I just hope I can't hurt anything.
_____

Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a
CRT based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something.
Televisions are not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and
vertical rates. CRT televisions have very high power horizontal drive
circuits that also help produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons
toward the screen. Since you don't have a profile registered for the TV
you use, and since you are using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the
video card to horizontal rates that the TV set can't handle, and that may
cause damage. If you are lucky, your TV will just reject harmful rates.

Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower
frequency cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video
signal will have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.


Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not be
possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on the TV
out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever standard the
TV uses).

--
Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
To email, remove "nospam" from
Home Page:
http://www.roberthancock.com/



  #10  
Old July 29th 05, 12:56 AM
Philadelphia Frank
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Nvidia driver did what I needed. There was a NKeystone menu that
allowed me to shrink the image so that it fit on my HDTV. A problem
I'm still having is that the "Keystone" adjustment doesn't always
hold. If I run Flight Simulator the window reverts back to it's too
big size. I can't see or use the top part of the screen.

I suspect the top part of the screen is cut off for broadcast TV as
well, particularly when I'm using the 4.3 aspect. The brand of TV is
AKAI and it isn't very user friendly. The "customer care" is even
worse. I'll bet there is a way to make adjustments but Akai isn't
volunteering any info on how.

So my original question has been answered. Nvidia has a "Keystone"
adjustment that did the trick.

Thank you for all your help;

Frank

On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 05:10:46 GMT, "Phil Weldon"
wrote:

'Robert Hancock' wrote:
| Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not
| be possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on
| the TV out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever
| standard the TV uses).
_____

Except that 'Philadelphia Frank' posted
"I'm having a little success using Powerstrip
changing frequencies, vertical and horizontal. The complication is
that it is trial and error. As I bounce around different frequencies,
I watch the screen resize and/or distort."

Don't you think that is a pretty good indication that the horizontal and
vertical scan rates ARE changing, and the output being used is NOT
composite?

Phil Weldon


"Robert Hancock" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Phil Weldon wrote:
'Philadelphia Frank' wrote, in part:
| I just hope I can't hurt anything.
_____

Depends on what kind of TV you have. IF your television is a CRT, or a
CRT based projection TV, then it is possible to hurt something.
Televisions are not designed to handle a wide range of horizontal and
vertical rates. CRT televisions have very high power horizontal drive
circuits that also help produce the high voltage to accelerate electrons
toward the screen. Since you don't have a profile registered for the TV
you use, and since you are using Powerstrip, it is possible to set the
video card to horizontal rates that the TV set can't handle, and that may
cause damage. If you are lucky, your TV will just reject harmful rates.

Also, the video amplifiers in a TV set are likely to have a lower
frequency cut off. For higher horiziontal and vertical rates, the video
signal will have a higher frequency, and resolution will suffer.


Unless he's using some wierd form of RGB input on the TV, it should not be
possible to hurt anything. The video card cannot output anything on the TV
out except for the normal frequencies for NTSC (or whatever standard the
TV uses).

--
Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
To email, remove "nospam" from
Home Page:
http://www.roberthancock.com/



 




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