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Mouse Woes



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 20th 04, 07:52 PM
Chris Martin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Mouse Woes

Long explanation, TIA.

I have the Microsoft Wireless Optical Desktop (Wireless Optical Mouse and
Microsoft Wireless Multimedia Keyboard). The issue that I am having is:
Doing stuff fine on the computer, la di da, I don't use the mouse for a
little while, then go to move it.. and it does not respond. Interesting.
So I click. It then works fine.. until i don't move it again. So I flip
the sucker upside down and try and get a little more technical about it. I
set a timer and wait. After 60 seconds of inactivity, the laser dims, then
starts flickering. At this point the cursur will not move until I click.
Ok, some sort of battery saving standby, I assume, but it should be taken
out of standby from movement as well as from a click. (I've installed the
latest intellipoint and intellitype software from windows). Microsofts
knowledgebase has an article that kind of describes this issue... but it's
solution is wiping my mouse from registry and reinstalling. Honestly I hate
messing with my registry when I don't have to, especially when I don't know
if that is the actual issue. Any other ideas? Thanks again for reading.

~Chris Martin



  #2  
Old January 22nd 04, 06:53 AM
*Vanguard*
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Chris Martin" said in
t:
Long explanation, TIA.

I have the Microsoft Wireless Optical Desktop (Wireless Optical Mouse
and Microsoft Wireless Multimedia Keyboard). The issue that I am
having is: Doing stuff fine on the computer, la di da, I don't use
the mouse for a little while, then go to move it.. and it does not
respond. Interesting. So I click. It then works fine.. until i
don't move it again. So I flip the sucker upside down and try and
get a little more technical about it. I set a timer and wait. After
60 seconds of inactivity, the laser dims, then starts flickering. At
this point the cursur will not move until I click. Ok, some sort of
battery saving standby, I assume, but it should be taken out of
standby from movement as well as from a click. (I've installed the
latest intellipoint and intellitype software from windows).
Microsofts knowledgebase has an article that kind of describes this
issue... but it's solution is wiping my mouse from registry and
reinstalling. Honestly I hate messing with my registry when I don't
have to, especially when I don't know if that is the actual issue.
Any other ideas? Thanks again for reading.

~Chris Martin


My Logitech cordless went dead (after I tossed it across the room in a fit
during gaming). So I trialed several other cordless mice to see if any were
better. I tried the IBM cordless. Didn't like it because it goes into
sleep mode mode too quickly. The Logitech doesn't go to sleep until about a
minute after no movement, and it comes out of sleep much quicker because it
polls (blinks) much more often while sleeping (i.e., it peeks its eyelid
open more often to see if it is being moved). There is no inertial sensors
in the mice to detect when to wake up out of low-power mode to prolong
battery life. How often then peek to check for movement dictates how
quickly they will come out of sleep mode. IBM was slowest. Microsoft's was
faster. Logitech's was fastest. However, the more it peeks the more juice
it uses from the battery so battery life for the Logitech is shorter.
That's why I bought 2 sets of rechargeable NimH batteries so one is always
ready when the inuse set gets too low on juice.

I also found the IBM and Microsoft more jerky in movement than the Logitech,
especially in games. I tried editing the mouse properties to speed up the
sample or poll rate but that didn't help much. In fact, with the IBM (and
to a lesser degree the Microsoft) cordless mouse, the cursor would actually
stall or even move in the opposite direction with extreme fast whips of the
mouse across the desk. Although you can up the sample rate for the mouse
driver, I don't think this affects the hardware poll rate between the mouse
and the receiver unit.

When I had to replace my cordless mouse, the reason I looked at the IBM and
Microsoft was that they are lighter in weight than the Logitech. My pinkie
gets tired squeezing the mouse to push it around or when lifting it. I've
tried several trackballs (I like them better than mice). I somewhat like
the Kensington Expert Mouse because of its large ball that rolls freely on
steel rollers with ball bearings (the ball can be replaced with a snooker
ball if the kids take the original) but I never quite liked the buttons at
the side of the ball instead of slightly ahead where my fingers would be,
and I didn't like the reverse tilt that cocked my wrist upward. But it was
the most durable and smooth trackball I've ever had. Their other trackballs
suck: too much resistance, the ball won't keep spinning when you flick it,
and they don't feel right. I eventually went to a mouse only because I
could get cordless mice; otherwise, I'd still be using a trackball (although
the Expert Mouse is pricey). With the trackball, I wasn't moving it all
over the desk and so my pinkie wouldn't tire like when squeezing a mouse to
move it around or lift it. The IBM was lighter so I tried it first. Too
jerky in games, stalled or reversed direction when snapping the mouse
quickly but only occurred in one direction (don't recall which), and kept
going to sleep way too soon and took too long to wake up. Microsoft was a
bit heavier but still lighter than the Logitech, so I tried it next but it
went to sleep too soon and took too long to wake up (shorter than the IBM
but longer than Logitech) and would sometimes stall or jerk when rapidly
slid across the desk. So I ended up going back to the Logitech which was
the heaviest of the three.

So while the Logitech doesn't last as long before the batteries get too low
for reliable performance or when it goes completely dead, I still find it a
better mouse than IBM's cordless mouse and Microsoft's blue cordless mouse.
Batteries don't last as long in the Logitech and it is heavier than the
others but it does move smooth, doesn't go to sleep as soon, comes out of
sleep quicker, and the battery cover is much easier to remove and replace
than the others (especially important since the batteries have to be
replaced after 15 to 22 days).

Although these use RF instead of infrared to communicate between mouse and
receiver unit, you still should not have anything between them that will
shield the signal, like the monitor or system case. Also, after replacing
the batteries, be sure to hit the reset button on the bottom of the mouse
and the reset button on the receiver to make sure they are in sync.
Otherwise, when not synched, I've seen jerky movement of the mouse cursor or
none at all.


--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________


  #3  
Old January 22nd 04, 08:12 PM
Chris Martin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It actually did turn out to be the batteries. The old batteries were going
low on juice, so I replaced them with practically fresh batteries (took them
out of my digital camera which told me they had full charge still), and put
them into my mouse. The mouse didn't like them. SO after calling microsoft
tech support, trying the mouse on multiple computers, etc. etc., I changed
the batteries back to the old one and it worked again. Peachy. So I put
the new ones back in and then they wanted to work.. Maybe they weren't set
right.

On another note, I've seen some insane gaming on trackballs, but I could
never get used to them myself, I have a few of them, thinking about thowing
one of them on a computer and attempting to get used to it.

Thanks for the response,
~Chris

"*Vanguard*" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
"Chris Martin" said in
t:
Long explanation, TIA.

I have the Microsoft Wireless Optical Desktop (Wireless Optical Mouse
and Microsoft Wireless Multimedia Keyboard). The issue that I am
having is: Doing stuff fine on the computer, la di da, I don't use
the mouse for a little while, then go to move it.. and it does not
respond. Interesting. So I click. It then works fine.. until i
don't move it again. So I flip the sucker upside down and try and
get a little more technical about it. I set a timer and wait. After
60 seconds of inactivity, the laser dims, then starts flickering. At
this point the cursur will not move until I click. Ok, some sort of
battery saving standby, I assume, but it should be taken out of
standby from movement as well as from a click. (I've installed the
latest intellipoint and intellitype software from windows).
Microsofts knowledgebase has an article that kind of describes this
issue... but it's solution is wiping my mouse from registry and
reinstalling. Honestly I hate messing with my registry when I don't
have to, especially when I don't know if that is the actual issue.
Any other ideas? Thanks again for reading.

~Chris Martin


My Logitech cordless went dead (after I tossed it across the room in a fit
during gaming). So I trialed several other cordless mice to see if any

were
better. I tried the IBM cordless. Didn't like it because it goes into
sleep mode mode too quickly. The Logitech doesn't go to sleep until about

a
minute after no movement, and it comes out of sleep much quicker because

it
polls (blinks) much more often while sleeping (i.e., it peeks its eyelid
open more often to see if it is being moved). There is no inertial

sensors
in the mice to detect when to wake up out of low-power mode to prolong
battery life. How often then peek to check for movement dictates how
quickly they will come out of sleep mode. IBM was slowest. Microsoft's

was
faster. Logitech's was fastest. However, the more it peeks the more

juice
it uses from the battery so battery life for the Logitech is shorter.
That's why I bought 2 sets of rechargeable NimH batteries so one is always
ready when the inuse set gets too low on juice.

I also found the IBM and Microsoft more jerky in movement than the

Logitech,
especially in games. I tried editing the mouse properties to speed up the
sample or poll rate but that didn't help much. In fact, with the IBM (and
to a lesser degree the Microsoft) cordless mouse, the cursor would

actually
stall or even move in the opposite direction with extreme fast whips of

the
mouse across the desk. Although you can up the sample rate for the mouse
driver, I don't think this affects the hardware poll rate between the

mouse
and the receiver unit.

When I had to replace my cordless mouse, the reason I looked at the IBM

and
Microsoft was that they are lighter in weight than the Logitech. My

pinkie
gets tired squeezing the mouse to push it around or when lifting it. I've
tried several trackballs (I like them better than mice). I somewhat like
the Kensington Expert Mouse because of its large ball that rolls freely on
steel rollers with ball bearings (the ball can be replaced with a snooker
ball if the kids take the original) but I never quite liked the buttons at
the side of the ball instead of slightly ahead where my fingers would be,
and I didn't like the reverse tilt that cocked my wrist upward. But it

was
the most durable and smooth trackball I've ever had. Their other

trackballs
suck: too much resistance, the ball won't keep spinning when you flick it,
and they don't feel right. I eventually went to a mouse only because I
could get cordless mice; otherwise, I'd still be using a trackball

(although
the Expert Mouse is pricey). With the trackball, I wasn't moving it all
over the desk and so my pinkie wouldn't tire like when squeezing a mouse

to
move it around or lift it. The IBM was lighter so I tried it first. Too
jerky in games, stalled or reversed direction when snapping the mouse
quickly but only occurred in one direction (don't recall which), and kept
going to sleep way too soon and took too long to wake up. Microsoft was a
bit heavier but still lighter than the Logitech, so I tried it next but it
went to sleep too soon and took too long to wake up (shorter than the IBM
but longer than Logitech) and would sometimes stall or jerk when rapidly
slid across the desk. So I ended up going back to the Logitech which was
the heaviest of the three.

So while the Logitech doesn't last as long before the batteries get too

low
for reliable performance or when it goes completely dead, I still find it

a
better mouse than IBM's cordless mouse and Microsoft's blue cordless

mouse.
Batteries don't last as long in the Logitech and it is heavier than the
others but it does move smooth, doesn't go to sleep as soon, comes out of
sleep quicker, and the battery cover is much easier to remove and replace
than the others (especially important since the batteries have to be
replaced after 15 to 22 days).

Although these use RF instead of infrared to communicate between mouse and
receiver unit, you still should not have anything between them that will
shield the signal, like the monitor or system case. Also, after replacing
the batteries, be sure to hit the reset button on the bottom of the mouse
and the reset button on the receiver to make sure they are in sync.
Otherwise, when not synched, I've seen jerky movement of the mouse cursor

or
none at all.


--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________




  #4  
Old January 24th 04, 06:03 AM
*Vanguard*
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Chris Martin" said in
t:
It actually did turn out to be the batteries. The old batteries were
going low on juice, so I replaced them with practically fresh
batteries (took them out of my digital camera which told me they had
full charge still), and put them into my mouse. The mouse didn't
like them. SO after calling microsoft tech support, trying the mouse
on multiple computers, etc. etc., I changed the batteries back to the
old one and it worked again. Peachy. So I put the new ones back in
and then they wanted to work.. Maybe they weren't set right.

On another note, I've seen some insane gaming on trackballs, but I
could never get used to them myself, I have a few of them, thinking
about thowing one of them on a computer and attempting to get used to
it.

Thanks for the response,
~Chris

"*Vanguard*" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
"Chris Martin" said in
t:
Long explanation, TIA.

I have the Microsoft Wireless Optical Desktop (Wireless Optical
Mouse and Microsoft Wireless Multimedia Keyboard). The issue that
I am having is: Doing stuff fine on the computer, la di da, I don't
use the mouse for a little while, then go to move it.. and it does
not respond. Interesting. So I click. It then works fine.. until i
don't move it again. So I flip the sucker upside down and try and
get a little more technical about it. I set a timer and wait.
After 60 seconds of inactivity, the laser dims, then starts
flickering. At this point the cursur will not move until I click.
Ok, some sort of battery saving standby, I assume, but it should be
taken out of standby from movement as well as from a click. (I've
installed the latest intellipoint and intellitype software from
windows). Microsofts knowledgebase has an article that kind of
describes this issue... but it's solution is wiping my mouse from
registry and reinstalling. Honestly I hate messing with my
registry when I don't have to, especially when I don't know if that
is the actual issue. Any other ideas? Thanks again for reading.

~Chris Martin


My Logitech cordless went dead (after I tossed it across the room in
a fit during gaming). So I trialed several other cordless mice to
see if any were better. I tried the IBM cordless. Didn't like it
because it goes into sleep mode mode too quickly. The Logitech
doesn't go to sleep until about a minute after no movement, and it
comes out of sleep much quicker because it polls (blinks) much more
often while sleeping (i.e., it peeks its eyelid open more often to
see if it is being moved). There is no inertial sensors in the mice
to detect when to wake up out of low-power mode to prolong battery
life. How often then peek to check for movement dictates how
quickly they will come out of sleep mode. IBM was slowest.
Microsoft's was faster. Logitech's was fastest. However, the more
it peeks the more juice it uses from the battery so battery life for
the Logitech is shorter. That's why I bought 2 sets of rechargeable
NimH batteries so one is always ready when the inuse set gets too
low on juice.

I also found the IBM and Microsoft more jerky in movement than the
Logitech, especially in games. I tried editing the mouse properties
to speed up the sample or poll rate but that didn't help much. In
fact, with the IBM (and to a lesser degree the Microsoft) cordless
mouse, the cursor would actually stall or even move in the opposite
direction with extreme fast whips of the mouse across the desk.
Although you can up the sample rate for the mouse driver, I don't
think this affects the hardware poll rate between the mouse and the
receiver unit.

When I had to replace my cordless mouse, the reason I looked at the
IBM and Microsoft was that they are lighter in weight than the
Logitech. My pinkie gets tired squeezing the mouse to push it
around or when lifting it. I've tried several trackballs (I like
them better than mice). I somewhat like the Kensington Expert Mouse
because of its large ball that rolls freely on steel rollers with
ball bearings (the ball can be replaced with a snooker ball if the
kids take the original) but I never quite liked the buttons at the
side of the ball instead of slightly ahead where my fingers would
be, and I didn't like the reverse tilt that cocked my wrist upward.
But it was the most durable and smooth trackball I've ever had.
Their other trackballs suck: too much resistance, the ball won't
keep spinning when you flick it, and they don't feel right. I
eventually went to a mouse only because I could get cordless mice;
otherwise, I'd still be using a trackball (although the Expert Mouse
is pricey). With the trackball, I wasn't moving it all over the
desk and so my pinkie wouldn't tire like when squeezing a mouse to
move it around or lift it. The IBM was lighter so I tried it first.
Too jerky in games, stalled or reversed direction when snapping the
mouse quickly but only occurred in one direction (don't recall
which), and kept going to sleep way too soon and took too long to
wake up. Microsoft was a bit heavier but still lighter than the
Logitech, so I tried it next but it went to sleep too soon and took
too long to wake up (shorter than the IBM but longer than Logitech)
and would sometimes stall or jerk when rapidly slid across the desk.
So I ended up going back to the Logitech which was the heaviest of
the three.

So while the Logitech doesn't last as long before the batteries get
too low for reliable performance or when it goes completely dead, I
still find it a better mouse than IBM's cordless mouse and
Microsoft's blue cordless mouse. Batteries don't last as long in the
Logitech and it is heavier than the others but it does move smooth,
doesn't go to sleep as soon, comes out of sleep quicker, and the
battery cover is much easier to remove and replace than the others
(especially important since the batteries have to be replaced after
15 to 22 days).

Although these use RF instead of infrared to communicate between
mouse and receiver unit, you still should not have anything between
them that will shield the signal, like the monitor or system case.
Also, after replacing the batteries, be sure to hit the reset button
on the bottom of the mouse and the reset button on the receiver to
make sure they are in sync. Otherwise, when not synched, I've seen
jerky movement of the mouse cursor or none at all.


--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________


Because batteries do not last as long in Logitech cordless devices as they
do in other cordless brands (because Logitech polls more often to check when
to come out of sleep), you might consider buying another set of NimH
batteries and a charger to charge them up and have ready when the current
ones get drained.

A trick is to NOT display Logitech's mouse tray icon. It has the behavior
that when the batteries go low that it will popup an alert window. But if
this popup is hidden, doesn't appear, or you close it but forget about it,
the other behavior is that their mouse software will make their tray icon
reappear. It gives you a hint that you need to check the mouse and its
battery level. Once you exchange the batteries for the already charged
pair, check the option to hide the mouse tray icon again. Then if you see
the mouse tray icon later, it's time to replace the batteries again.


--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________


 




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