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GBps to MB/s



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 24th 19, 05:35 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
amdx[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default GBps to MB/s

To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
Mikek
  #2  
Old January 24th 19, 06:48 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_28_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 946
Default GBps to MB/s

amdx wrote:
To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
Mikek


If you're looking on an oscilloscope at the wire, the 10Gbit/sec does
amount to 1250MB/sec in a sense. What's missing is an accounting of
coding loss. More bits are used to encode the data, than you get to use.
On USB3, a 10 bit long sequence of ones and zeros, represents 8 bits
of user data. That's a 25% overhead for transmission on the
physical media.

*******

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_3.0

USB3.1 Gen1 5Gbit/sec, 8b/10b encoded, 500MB/sec channel rate usable
USB3.1 Gen2 10Gbit/sec, 128b/132b
10000 * 128/132 * 1 byte/8 bits = 1212.12MB/sec channel rate usable

*******

8b/10b was likely originally invented to allow the construction of
AC coupled amplifiers for the PHY. It originated on fiber optics,
but also turned out to be convenient for similar situations arising
on high speed wires. (PCI Express is AC coupled. Maybe SATA is too.
It's hard to track down the details if the standards are hidden.)

The coding scheme also allows the construction of out-of-band symbols.
You can have a 10 bit pattern which does not decode to a byte, and
the indication means something in terms of the framing. Perhaps such
a symbol would be a JK.

In this article, the K28.5 would have been popular (for something
I worked on), but I couldn't tell you what now :-) Such things can
be used for serial byte-sync, delimiting the "edges" of a byte, in
a byte stream.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8b/10b_encoding

Wiki doesn't seem to have a 128b/132b article, but has a high efficiency
section more or less. Implying that maybe 128b/132b is somehow related
to 64b/66b. Using the longer period implies they might be using two
out-of-band symbols in a row to indicate something, and this translates
to "a longer encoding method". Even though it's a trivial extension of it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64b/66b_encoding

The ultimate efficiency comes from "scramblers", which use self-synchronizing
PRBS patterns or so. A scrambler has zero overhead, so one byte in, one byte
out. Scramblers are used on high rate SONET or SDH. The purpose of a scrambler
is to remove long sequences of all 1's or all 0's, which would upset
amplification or data recovery (need transitions for clock recovery). The
theory goes, that the "user" of the pipe, doesn't know the scrambling, and
it would be "hard" for an end user to apply the "converse" of the scrambler,
such that after scrambling, the "feared pattern of all 1's or 0's" occurs.
If you know a scrambler is being used instead of an encoder, you'd take
10000 and divide by 8.

HTH,
Paul
  #3  
Old January 24th 19, 08:33 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
amdx[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default GBps to MB/s

On 1/24/2019 11:48 AM, Paul wrote:
amdx wrote:
To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps
in MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

¬*I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
¬*Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek


If you're looking on an oscilloscope at the wire, the 10Gbit/sec does
amount to 1250MB/sec in a sense. What's missing is an accounting of
coding loss. More bits are used to encode the data, than you get to use.
On USB3, a 10 bit long sequence of ones and zeros, represents 8 bits
of user data. That's a 25% overhead for transmission on the
physical media.

*******

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_3.0

¬*¬* USB3.1 Gen1¬*¬* 5Gbit/sec, 8b/10b encoded, 500MB/sec channel rate usable
¬*¬* USB3.1 Gen2¬*¬* 10Gbit/sec, 128b/132b
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* 10000 * 128/132 * 1 byte/8 bits = 1212.12MB/sec
channel rate usable

*******

8b/10b was likely originally invented to allow the construction of
AC coupled amplifiers for the PHY. It originated on fiber optics,
but also turned out to be convenient for similar situations arising
on high speed wires. (PCI Express is AC coupled. Maybe SATA is too.
It's hard to track down the details if the standards are hidden.)

The coding scheme also allows the construction of out-of-band symbols.
You can have a 10 bit pattern which does not decode to a byte, and
the indication means something in terms of the framing. Perhaps such
a symbol would be a JK.

In this article, the K28.5 would have been popular (for something
I worked on), but I couldn't tell you what now :-) Such things can
be used for serial byte-sync, delimiting the "edges" of a byte, in
a byte stream.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8b/10b_encoding

Wiki doesn't seem to have a 128b/132b article, but has a high efficiency
section more or less. Implying that maybe 128b/132b is somehow related
to 64b/66b. Using the longer period implies they might be using two
out-of-band symbols in a row to indicate something, and this translates
to "a longer encoding method". Even though it's a trivial extension of it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64b/66b_encoding

The ultimate efficiency comes from "scramblers", which use
self-synchronizing
PRBS patterns or so. A scrambler has zero overhead, so one byte in, one
byte
out. Scramblers are used on high rate SONET or SDH. The purpose of a
scrambler
is to remove long sequences of all 1's or all 0's, which would upset
amplification or data recovery (need transitions for clock recovery). The
theory goes, that the "user" of the pipe, doesn't know the scrambling, and
it would be "hard" for an end user to apply the "converse" of the
scrambler,
such that after scrambling, the "feared pattern of all 1's or 0's" occurs.
If you know a scrambler is being used instead of an encoder, you'd take
10000 and divide by 8.

HTH,
¬*¬*¬* Paul


Thanks Paul, I'll try 1212.12MB/s after my time out ends.
Mikek
  #4  
Old January 24th 19, 10:19 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,328
Default GBps to MB/s

amdx wrote:

To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
Mikek


Gbps = Giga*bit* per second (smallcase "b" means "bit")
MB/s = Mega*byte* per second (uppercase "B" means "byte")

You should already be aware there are 8 bits to a byte. Divide by 8 to
change bits to bytes. Then multiply by 1000 to change giga to mega
(which assumes they are talking gigabytes and megabytes based on a power
of 10 instead of gibibits and mebibytes based on a power of 2).

10 Gbps / (8 bits/byte) ) * 1000 = 1250 MB/s.

The question does not address the encoding overhead for each packet, as
Paul mentioned. "speed" may refer to the effective transfer rate
regardless of the packet overhead: what got delivered irregardless of
how it got packaged during transport. Data transfer rate will be less
than the "speed" of a protocol due to packaging overhead; however, most
users consider data transfer rate (for just the data blocks within the
packets) and the speed of the connection as the same.

Is this forum populated by Mensa members? A typical mathematical
CAPTCHA just asks for simple arithmetic computation, not for calculating
a Fourier transform or the primes within a variable range. Is it a
forum populated by USB engineers that are expected to intimately know
this stuff?
  #5  
Old January 25th 19, 01:37 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
amdx[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default GBps to MB/s

On 1/24/2019 3:19 PM, VanguardLH wrote:
amdx wrote:

To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
Mikek


Gbps = Giga*bit* per second (smallcase "b" means "bit")
MB/s = Mega*byte* per second (uppercase "B" means "byte")

You should already be aware there are 8 bits to a byte. Divide by 8 to
change bits to bytes. Then multiply by 1000 to change giga to mega
(which assumes they are talking gigabytes and megabytes based on a power
of 10 instead of gibibits and mebibytes based on a power of 2).

10 Gbps / (8 bits/byte) ) * 1000 = 1250 MB/s.

The question does not address the encoding overhead for each packet, as
Paul mentioned. "speed" may refer to the effective transfer rate
regardless of the packet overhead: what got delivered irregardless of
how it got packaged during transport. Data transfer rate will be less
than the "speed" of a protocol due to packaging overhead; however, most
users consider data transfer rate (for just the data blocks within the
packets) and the speed of the connection as the same.

Is this forum populated by Mensa members? A typical mathematical
CAPTCHA just asks for simple arithmetic computation, not for calculating
a Fourier transform or the primes within a variable range. Is it a
forum populated by USB engineers that are expected to intimately know
this stuff?


Ok, I have tried 1000MB/s, 1250MB/s and 1212.12MB/s
and I get, "You have provided an invalid answer to the question."

Mikek
  #6  
Old January 25th 19, 02:21 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
amdx[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default GBps to MB/s

On 1/24/2019 6:37 PM, amdx wrote:
On 1/24/2019 3:19 PM, VanguardLH wrote:
amdx wrote:

To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

¬*¬* I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
¬*¬* Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek


Gbps = Giga*bit* per second¬* (smallcase "b" means "bit")
MB/s = Mega*byte* per second (uppercase "B" means "byte")

You should already be aware there are 8 bits to a byte.¬* Divide by 8 to
change bits to bytes.¬* Then multiply by 1000 to change giga to mega
(which assumes they are talking gigabytes and megabytes based on a power
of 10 instead of gibibits and mebibytes based on a power of 2).

10 Gbps / (8 bits/byte) ) * 1000 = 1250 MB/s.

The question does not address the encoding overhead for each packet, as
Paul mentioned.¬* "speed" may refer to the effective transfer rate
regardless of the packet overhead: what got delivered irregardless of
how it got packaged during transport.¬* Data transfer rate will be less
than the "speed" of a protocol due to packaging overhead; however, most
users consider data transfer rate (for just the data blocks within the
packets) and the speed of the connection as the same.

Is this forum populated by Mensa members?¬* A typical mathematical
CAPTCHA just asks for simple arithmetic computation, not for calculating
a Fourier transform or the primes within a variable range.¬* Is it a
forum populated by USB engineers that are expected to intimately know
this stuff?


¬*Ok, I have tried 1000MB/s, 1250MB/s and 1212.12MB/s
and I get, "You have provided an invalid answer to the question."

¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* ¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* Mikek


Thanks guys, I finally got in with 1250 MB/s.
The question:
"If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):"

The space was important in the answer, but apparently not in the question!
  #7  
Old January 25th 19, 03:56 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,328
Default GBps to MB/s

amdx wrote:

On 1/24/2019 3:19 PM, VanguardLH wrote:
amdx wrote:

To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
Mikek


Gbps = Giga*bit* per second (smallcase "b" means "bit")
MB/s = Mega*byte* per second (uppercase "B" means "byte")

You should already be aware there are 8 bits to a byte. Divide by 8 to
change bits to bytes. Then multiply by 1000 to change giga to mega
(which assumes they are talking gigabytes and megabytes based on a power
of 10 instead of gibibits and mebibytes based on a power of 2).

10 Gbps / (8 bits/byte) ) * 1000 = 1250 MB/s.

The question does not address the encoding overhead for each packet, as
Paul mentioned. "speed" may refer to the effective transfer rate
regardless of the packet overhead: what got delivered irregardless of
how it got packaged during transport. Data transfer rate will be less
than the "speed" of a protocol due to packaging overhead; however, most
users consider data transfer rate (for just the data blocks within the
packets) and the speed of the connection as the same.

Is this forum populated by Mensa members? A typical mathematical
CAPTCHA just asks for simple arithmetic computation, not for calculating
a Fourier transform or the primes within a variable range. Is it a
forum populated by USB engineers that are expected to intimately know
this stuff?


Ok, I have tried 1000MB/s, 1250MB/s and 1212.12MB/s
and I get, "You have provided an invalid answer to the question."

Mikek


Did you try WITHOUT the MB/s string in your answer? The question
already asks "in MB/s" and "(Answer must be MB/s)". Don't include the
dimension in the answer, just the numerical value.
  #8  
Old January 25th 19, 03:57 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,328
Default GBps to MB/s

amdx wrote:

On 1/24/2019 6:37 PM, amdx wrote:
On 1/24/2019 3:19 PM, VanguardLH wrote:
amdx wrote:

To prevent spambots I need to answer this question to confirm
registration to a forum.

If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):

** I thought it would just be Gig to Meg or 1000, but I get that is an
invalid answer, So I googled and found:
" 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed 10 Gbit/s = 1250 Megabytes per second"
But that also gives me a that is an invalid answer.
** Yes, I putting it in MB/s form, either 1000MB/s or 1250MB/s

Any ideas?
*********************** Mikek

Gbps = Giga*bit* per second* (smallcase "b" means "bit")
MB/s = Mega*byte* per second (uppercase "B" means "byte")

You should already be aware there are 8 bits to a byte.* Divide by 8 to
change bits to bytes.* Then multiply by 1000 to change giga to mega
(which assumes they are talking gigabytes and megabytes based on a power
of 10 instead of gibibits and mebibytes based on a power of 2).

10 Gbps / (8 bits/byte) ) * 1000 = 1250 MB/s.

The question does not address the encoding overhead for each packet, as
Paul mentioned.* "speed" may refer to the effective transfer rate
regardless of the packet overhead: what got delivered irregardless of
how it got packaged during transport.* Data transfer rate will be less
than the "speed" of a protocol due to packaging overhead; however, most
users consider data transfer rate (for just the data blocks within the
packets) and the speed of the connection as the same.

Is this forum populated by Mensa members?* A typical mathematical
CAPTCHA just asks for simple arithmetic computation, not for calculating
a Fourier transform or the primes within a variable range.* Is it a
forum populated by USB engineers that are expected to intimately know
this stuff?


*Ok, I have tried 1000MB/s, 1250MB/s and 1212.12MB/s
and I get, "You have provided an invalid answer to the question."

*********************************** Mikek


Thanks guys, I finally got in with 1250 MB/s.
The question:
"If USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 2 speed is 10Gbps, What is the speed of 10Gbps in
MB/s (Answer must include MB/s):"

The space was important in the answer, but apparently not in the question!


I see you got it. I suspect they simply parsed on a word boundary to
get the numerical value, so your "MB/s" got discarded and just the
"1250" got accepted. The question, per its wording, only wanted a
numerical answer, not the dimension (MB/s).
 




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