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Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 18th 09, 08:02 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
Skybuck Flying[_2_]
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Posts: 1,459
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

Hello,

I have a question for you:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?

(Some glue's appear to become conductive after exposure to heat, moisture in
air, and electricity (?))

Also it would be a big plus if the glue can be removed with water and soap
or any other means...

Bye,
Skybuck.


  #2  
Old May 18th 09, 08:15 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
Skybuck Flying[_2_]
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Posts: 1,459
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

Going to try and forward this to chemistry newsgroup.
(Failed, no such newsgroup, so just gonna be a regular follow-up

Electrolysis comes to mind...

I learned that once in a chemistry class on school.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/electrolysis

From that dictionary:

"
1. Chemical change, especially decomposition, produced in an electrolyte by
an electric current.
"

The thruth could be that no glue is safe from electrolysis ?

Bye,
Skybuck.

"Skybuck Flying" wrote in message
b.home.nl...
Hello,

I have a question for you:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?

(Some glue's appear to become conductive after exposure to heat, moisture
in air, and electricity (?))

Also it would be a big plus if the glue can be removed with water and soap
or any other means...

Bye,
Skybuck.



  #3  
Old May 18th 09, 08:28 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
Skybuck Flying[_2_]
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Posts: 1,459
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

Some further slightly interesting links:

Electrolyte:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolyte

Glue:

(Doesn't contain much about non-conductive glue)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adhesive

Maybe glueing electronics together is a bad idea and simply indicates
non-sturdy/bad design (?!)

One more link: printing electronics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printed_electronics

One possibly solution for the future could be a "double board" where
components are stuck together at the bottom and the top for extra sturdyness
?!?

Ofcourse this would make inspecting any damage impossible until everything
soldered loose... hmmm

Bye,
Skybuck.

"Skybuck Flying" wrote in message
b.home.nl...
Going to try and forward this to chemistry newsgroup.
(Failed, no such newsgroup, so just gonna be a regular follow-up

Electrolysis comes to mind...

I learned that once in a chemistry class on school.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/electrolysis

From that dictionary:

"
1. Chemical change, especially decomposition, produced in an electrolyte
by
an electric current.
"

The thruth could be that no glue is safe from electrolysis ?

Bye,
Skybuck.

"Skybuck Flying" wrote in message
b.home.nl...
Hello,

I have a question for you:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?

(Some glue's appear to become conductive after exposure to heat, moisture
in air, and electricity (?))

Also it would be a big plus if the glue can be removed with water and
soap or any other means...

Bye,
Skybuck.





  #4  
Old May 18th 09, 08:28 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
SteveH
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Posts: 335
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

Skybuck Flying wrote:

I learned that once in a chemistry class on school.

You went to school, you do surprise me.
There's me thinking you wuz just a pothead.

-
SteveH


  #5  
Old May 18th 09, 08:50 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
GregS
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Posts: 6
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

In article me.nl, "Skybuck Flying" wrote:
Hello,

I have a question for you:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?

(Some glue's appear to become conductive after exposure to heat, moisture in
air, and electricity (?))

Also it would be a big plus if the glue can be removed with water and soap
or any other means...


I had to fix one or two Sansui amplifier power boards with that conductive
stuff. I have used typical hot melt without problems, but
usually not on a conductor. I also use silicone rtv on most things.
Anything removed with soap and water seems like it would collect
moisture anyway.

greg
  #6  
Old May 18th 09, 09:08 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
Dangerous Bill
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Posts: 2
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

On May 18, 12:15*pm, "Skybuck Flying" wrote:
Going to try and forward this to chemistry newsgroup.
(Failed, no such newsgroup, so just gonna be a regular follow-up


Try sci.chem (which seems to be on an anti-semitic binge right now,
but there are real chemists there).

The answer you seek is that some glues interact with electronics. The
acid in silicone, especially, will dissolve traces on circuit boards.
Other than that, it works fine, especially if you apply it in an area
without traces. Don't trust a solder mask; some are porous.

Most other glues are nonconductive, too, such as epoxies. You can make
them conductive with metal particles, but the native glue is
conductive.

Dangerous Bill

  #7  
Old May 18th 09, 09:09 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
Dangerous Bill
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Posts: 2
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

On May 18, 12:50*pm, (GregS) wrote:

I had to fix one or two Sansui amplifier power boards with that conductive
stuff. I have used typical hot melt without problems, but
usually not on a conductor. I also use silicone rtv on most things.
Anything removed with soap and water seems like it would collect
moisture anyway.


I forgot about hot melt. It's the only glue that works reliably with
Teflon, too.

Dangerous Bill


  #8  
Old May 18th 09, 09:12 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
Skybuck Flying[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,459
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?


"GregS" wrote in message
...
In article me.nl,
"Skybuck Flying" wrote:
Hello,

I have a question for you:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?

(Some glue's appear to become conductive after exposure to heat, moisture
in
air, and electricity (?))

Also it would be a big plus if the glue can be removed with water and soap
or any other means...


I had to fix one or two Sansui amplifier power boards with that conductive
stuff. I have used typical hot melt without problems, but
usually not on a conductor. I also use silicone rtv on most things.
Anything removed with soap and water seems like it would collect
moisture anyway.


Hmm that's interesting.

This could be the reason why the repairman said that nothing could be done
about the "glue". (He hadn't seen it though... just over the phone...)

So the theory could be:

Trying to remove the glue from electronics components with water and soap
could then lead to damage to the components because of the water and the
soap (possibly on the long run) ?

Bye,
Skybuck.


  #9  
Old May 18th 09, 09:29 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
whit3rd
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Posts: 3
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

On May 18, 12:02*pm, "Skybuck Flying" wrote:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?


Yes, several. The usual route, though, is to let the factory epoxy
all the
wires to a chip, and folk in the field connect the wires (using
conductive
glue, i.e. solder). So, the conductive glues are more important for
the end users.
  #10  
Old May 18th 09, 09:36 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,sci.electronics.design
John Larkin
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Posts: 307
Default Non-conductive-removeable-glue ?

On Mon, 18 May 2009 21:02:43 +0200, "Skybuck Flying"
wrote:

Hello,

I have a question for you:

Is there a glue that can be used to glue together electronics without the
glue becoming conductive after a while ?

(Some glue's appear to become conductive after exposure to heat, moisture in
air, and electricity (?))

Also it would be a big plus if the glue can be removed with water and soap
or any other means...

Bye,
Skybuck.


Water soluble = conductive.

John

 




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