A computer components & hardware forum. HardwareBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » HardwareBanter forum » Motherboards » Asus Motherboards
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Life expectancy



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 10th 05, 12:19 AM
Travis King
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Life expectancy

What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I take good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.


  #2  
Old January 10th 05, 12:50 AM
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article [email protected]_s51, "Travis King"
wrote:

What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I take good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.


If the case temp is not excessive, the electrolytic caps should
be good for 10 years. Solder joints under stress, could be
anyone's guess (more likely to happen with a P4 retail heatsink
and its high clamping forces).

In ten years, you can expect several PSU failures, and any one of
those PSU failures could damage the motherboard.

If you have a lot of lightning storms, or bad quality power,
that could influence how long the mobo lasts. Look carefully
at any modem, cable modem, ADSL wires etc, to see if there are
any protection devices to take a (nearby) lightning hit, before
it gets to the motherboard. For example, on a phone line, there
may be a carbon block at the entry point, and you could enhance
that by using a second protection device nearer the computer.
For the really paranoid, a wireless network would reduce the
wiring exposure to just the power lines. A real ($1K purchase
price) UPS would reduce the risk of an AC power event from
getting you, and would help protect the PSU from getting
damaged. Cheap UPSes offer no protection at all, as they are
actually SPS (standby power supplies) - they are a "straight wire"
to power spikes, and the unit only cuts over to batteries if
the AC power dies for enough milliseconds.

On the motherboard itself, the Vcore circuit is the circuit under
the most stress. If the MOSFETs are cool to the touch, that is
a good sign. I've never read any MTBF estimates for switching
regulators on motherboards, so don't know whether they are
good for a 1 million hour MTBF or not.

Large BGA packages also have a rating, for solder joint
reliability. For example, a BGA with 750 pins, will last for
about 10 years, with a certain daily temperature variation.
From the Via web page:

* 552-pin BGA VT8366A North Bridge
* 376-pin BGA VT8233 South Bridge

so you have little risk of a failure there (caps will fail
first).

Handling the processor a lot (removal, regrease, reposition
heatsink) will cut into the life expectancy, if say the
processor gets cracked, and it happens to overload the Vcore
circuit. If the processor has the rubber bumpers on the top
of the chip, that will cut that risk a bit.

I would say your biggest exposure, is to external factors.

Paul
  #3  
Old January 10th 05, 03:30 AM
P2B
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Paul wrote:

In article [email protected]_s51, "Travis King"
wrote:


What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I take good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.



If the case temp is not excessive, the electrolytic caps should
be good for 10 years. Solder joints under stress, could be
anyone's guess (more likely to happen with a P4 retail heatsink
and its high clamping forces).

In ten years, you can expect several PSU failures, and any one of
those PSU failures could damage the motherboard.

If you have a lot of lightning storms, or bad quality power,
that could influence how long the mobo lasts. Look carefully
at any modem, cable modem, ADSL wires etc, to see if there are
any protection devices to take a (nearby) lightning hit, before
it gets to the motherboard. For example, on a phone line, there
may be a carbon block at the entry point, and you could enhance
that by using a second protection device nearer the computer.
For the really paranoid, a wireless network would reduce the
wiring exposure to just the power lines. A real ($1K purchase
price) UPS would reduce the risk of an AC power event from
getting you, and would help protect the PSU from getting
damaged. Cheap UPSes offer no protection at all, as they are
actually SPS (standby power supplies) - they are a "straight wire"
to power spikes, and the unit only cuts over to batteries if
the AC power dies for enough milliseconds.

On the motherboard itself, the Vcore circuit is the circuit under
the most stress. If the MOSFETs are cool to the touch, that is
a good sign. I've never read any MTBF estimates for switching
regulators on motherboards, so don't know whether they are
good for a 1 million hour MTBF or not.

Large BGA packages also have a rating, for solder joint
reliability. For example, a BGA with 750 pins, will last for
about 10 years, with a certain daily temperature variation.
From the Via web page:

* 552-pin BGA VT8366A North Bridge
* 376-pin BGA VT8233 South Bridge

so you have little risk of a failure there (caps will fail
first).

Handling the processor a lot (removal, regrease, reposition
heatsink) will cut into the life expectancy, if say the
processor gets cracked, and it happens to overload the Vcore
circuit. If the processor has the rubber bumpers on the top
of the chip, that will cut that risk a bit.

I would say your biggest exposure, is to external factors.

Paul


I would agree, and add that IME motherboards are far more tolerant of
external factors than one has any right to expect ;-)

Our Cottage PC runs an Asus P2B-S, manufactured in 1998 and in service
for almost 6 years. We use it on weekends in winter, but the cottage is
not heated while we are away, so the system experiences repeated thermal
stress cycles - it's common for the inside temperature to be -20C or
lower when we arrive. I discourage the kids from powering up the PC
until the place has warmed up, with limited success :-)

Power is unreliable at the Cottage, and we experience frequent
thunderstorms, however despite a lack of protective measures the only PC
failure which has occurred there to date was a sound card that stopped
working after lightning struck a tree behind the building - no doubt due
to a spike induced in the 40' cable running from the sound card to a
stereo system on the other side of the room. Hardly surprising, but
damage was limited to the sound card.

I expect the Cottage P2B-S to be the first of my numerous P2B series
boards to eventually fail, but perhaps not since I use several in my lab
and subject them to frequent CPU swaps and other hardware changes. My
primary system runs a P2B-DS and has been in service 7x24 since October
1997 except for occasional shutdowns for hardware upgrades or fan
service. The power supply refused to restart after a shutdown in 2002
and was replaced, but no other failures have occurred. I have a total of
11 P2B series boards in regular use, with zero motherboard failures to date.

I'd better start saving my pennies since replacing all my systems when
the electrolytic caps fail in 2008 will be expensive ;-)

P2B
  #4  
Old January 10th 05, 05:12 AM
Travis King
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have a relative that I had to replace her ECS board at 6 years old. Not
even 6 months before that, she gave me her computer and it wouldn't turn on
because the PSU went out. None of the card devices were no longer being
detected properly including the video card, modem, etc., but they all used
to be detected just fine. I reinstalled XP on it with no luck. By the way,
I did have a chipped AMD Athlon XP 1800+ running on it for a year. The
temperatures were a little higher on it than my 2400+, which is what I have
now. I have a 400w PSU. WD 80GB HD and WD 120GB HD. Lite On DVD drive.
Memorex 52x CD RW drive. NVIDIA GeForce3 Ti200. Do you think 4 years is a
good amount of time for getting a new computer for someone who edits
pictures frequently, does some gaming, lots of music, and some
multi-tasking? Thanks.
"Leythos" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected]_s51, says...
What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I take
good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.


I have a number of computers that date back to 1977 that still run just
fine. I also have a couple Dual Celeron 500Mhz machines that run well
that are almost 5 years old (or older I think).

As long as you change the PSU when it gets old (fan starts slowing and
not cooling properly) and protect the system with a good UPS, and keep
the vents clean (and CPU fan) it will last a long time - there are no
moving parts on a motherboard - you may need a new floppy, CD-ROM, or
hard drive.

--
--

(Remove 999 to reply to me)



  #5  
Old January 10th 05, 05:21 PM
Bob Rafuse
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The fans, disks and power supplies will most likely wear out before
the mobo components themselves. If you're not overclocking, IMO the
only thing that would normally prematurely kill a mobo would be dirty
power, a dusty environment (which can cause fans to fail or not work
properly, overheating the mobo), or high humidity.

We have a two of Pentium (I) servers at work that have been running
pretty much 24/7 (give or take a week or so) since '95/'96. I've had
to relace HD's, fans and power supplies (and one PCI video card), but
zero mobo components.

---
Bob




  #7  
Old January 12th 05, 01:03 AM
notritenoteri
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

YOu want to worry about something? Worry about your data. Your MB is
obsolete, Your OS is obselescent and going obsolete and the only thing
that's of any value is your data. All the stuff about UPS's is theory. Are
you running NASA and a lunar lander mission? If you are you should be shot
for having only a single system. Given enough time EVERY piece of equipment
will fail including $1000 UPS's.
I power my system on and off all the time. I don't shut down when lightening
storms are overhead and I never worry about the telephone lines or cable.
But I live where the power wiring is fairly new ~15 years and its above
ground. If lightening is going to get you its going to get you. I have
heard claims that buried power and phone cables are susceptable to problems
but I've never seen proof.

"Paul" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected]_s51, "Travis King"
wrote:

What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I take

good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.


If the case temp is not excessive, the electrolytic caps should
be good for 10 years. Solder joints under stress, could be
anyone's guess (more likely to happen with a P4 retail heatsink
and its high clamping forces).

In ten years, you can expect several PSU failures, and any one of
those PSU failures could damage the motherboard.

If you have a lot of lightning storms, or bad quality power,
that could influence how long the mobo lasts. Look carefully
at any modem, cable modem, ADSL wires etc, to see if there are
any protection devices to take a (nearby) lightning hit, before
it gets to the motherboard. For example, on a phone line, there
may be a carbon block at the entry point, and you could enhance
that by using a second protection device nearer the computer.
For the really paranoid, a wireless network would reduce the
wiring exposure to just the power lines. A real ($1K purchase
price) UPS would reduce the risk of an AC power event from
getting you, and would help protect the PSU from getting
damaged. Cheap UPSes offer no protection at all, as they are
actually SPS (standby power supplies) - they are a "straight wire"
to power spikes, and the unit only cuts over to batteries if
the AC power dies for enough milliseconds.

On the motherboard itself, the Vcore circuit is the circuit under
the most stress. If the MOSFETs are cool to the touch, that is
a good sign. I've never read any MTBF estimates for switching
regulators on motherboards, so don't know whether they are
good for a 1 million hour MTBF or not.

Large BGA packages also have a rating, for solder joint
reliability. For example, a BGA with 750 pins, will last for
about 10 years, with a certain daily temperature variation.
From the Via web page:

* 552-pin BGA VT8366A North Bridge
* 376-pin BGA VT8233 South Bridge

so you have little risk of a failure there (caps will fail
first).

Handling the processor a lot (removal, regrease, reposition
heatsink) will cut into the life expectancy, if say the
processor gets cracked, and it happens to overload the Vcore
circuit. If the processor has the rubber bumpers on the top
of the chip, that will cut that risk a bit.

I would say your biggest exposure, is to external factors.

Paul



  #8  
Old January 12th 05, 09:35 AM
Mercury
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Everything man makes turns to dust right?

I don't believe in tempting fate. There are plenty of low quality UPS and
surge protectors out there. I will generalise and say most low cost consumer
stuff is complete rubbish until I am proven otherwise.You can have a *good*
surge protector for as little as $US30. Many surge protectors are only good
for 1 surge!A good true online UPS for an average power computer can cost
$US250 or less.

RAID 1 costs 1 extra disc drive and a controller capable. It will protect
you from drive failures.

There is no replacement for quality proven backups kept off-site. This is
most important.

My sisters house got blown by lightning - oven, fax, x computers, TV's etc.
The only thing that worked afterwards was the traction engine.

Prevention is better than cure.



"notritenoteri" wrote in message
...
YOu want to worry about something? Worry about your data. Your MB is
obsolete, Your OS is obselescent and going obsolete and the only thing
that's of any value is your data. All the stuff about UPS's is theory.
Are
you running NASA and a lunar lander mission? If you are you should be shot
for having only a single system. Given enough time EVERY piece of
equipment
will fail including $1000 UPS's.
I power my system on and off all the time. I don't shut down when
lightening
storms are overhead and I never worry about the telephone lines or cable.
But I live where the power wiring is fairly new ~15 years and its above
ground. If lightening is going to get you its going to get you. I have
heard claims that buried power and phone cables are susceptable to
problems
but I've never seen proof.

"Paul" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected]_s51, "Travis King"
wrote:

What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I take

good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for
the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.


If the case temp is not excessive, the electrolytic caps should
be good for 10 years. Solder joints under stress, could be
anyone's guess (more likely to happen with a P4 retail heatsink
and its high clamping forces).

In ten years, you can expect several PSU failures, and any one of
those PSU failures could damage the motherboard.

If you have a lot of lightning storms, or bad quality power,
that could influence how long the mobo lasts. Look carefully
at any modem, cable modem, ADSL wires etc, to see if there are
any protection devices to take a (nearby) lightning hit, before
it gets to the motherboard. For example, on a phone line, there
may be a carbon block at the entry point, and you could enhance
that by using a second protection device nearer the computer.
For the really paranoid, a wireless network would reduce the
wiring exposure to just the power lines. A real ($1K purchase
price) UPS would reduce the risk of an AC power event from
getting you, and would help protect the PSU from getting
damaged. Cheap UPSes offer no protection at all, as they are
actually SPS (standby power supplies) - they are a "straight wire"
to power spikes, and the unit only cuts over to batteries if
the AC power dies for enough milliseconds.

On the motherboard itself, the Vcore circuit is the circuit under
the most stress. If the MOSFETs are cool to the touch, that is
a good sign. I've never read any MTBF estimates for switching
regulators on motherboards, so don't know whether they are
good for a 1 million hour MTBF or not.

Large BGA packages also have a rating, for solder joint
reliability. For example, a BGA with 750 pins, will last for
about 10 years, with a certain daily temperature variation.
From the Via web page:

* 552-pin BGA VT8366A North Bridge
* 376-pin BGA VT8233 South Bridge

so you have little risk of a failure there (caps will fail
first).

Handling the processor a lot (removal, regrease, reposition
heatsink) will cut into the life expectancy, if say the
processor gets cracked, and it happens to overload the Vcore
circuit. If the processor has the rubber bumpers on the top
of the chip, that will cut that risk a bit.

I would say your biggest exposure, is to external factors.

Paul





  #9  
Old January 12th 05, 04:18 PM
notritenoteri
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

MOst surge protectors aren't much good they just don't operate fast enough.
If U insist on protection a good UPS which convers AC to DC charges a
battery pack then provides AC out the other side with an inverter is the
best bet for my money. You can buy these in Canada where I am for about
$200. They have to be maintained and the batteries do go after about 5
years. As to RAID 1 I think you really need 4 drives, controller that is
smart and the software but maybe your definition is different than mine.

"Mercury" wrote in message
...
Everything man makes turns to dust right?

I don't believe in tempting fate. There are plenty of low quality UPS and
surge protectors out there. I will generalise and say most low cost

consumer
stuff is complete rubbish until I am proven otherwise.You can have a

*good*
surge protector for as little as $US30. Many surge protectors are only

good
for 1 surge!A good true online UPS for an average power computer can cost
$US250 or less.

RAID 1 costs 1 extra disc drive and a controller capable. It will protect
you from drive failures.

There is no replacement for quality proven backups kept off-site. This is
most important.

My sisters house got blown by lightning - oven, fax, x computers, TV's

etc.
The only thing that worked afterwards was the traction engine.

Prevention is better than cure.



"notritenoteri" wrote in message
...
YOu want to worry about something? Worry about your data. Your MB is
obsolete, Your OS is obselescent and going obsolete and the only thing
that's of any value is your data. All the stuff about UPS's is theory.
Are
you running NASA and a lunar lander mission? If you are you should be

shot
for having only a single system. Given enough time EVERY piece of
equipment
will fail including $1000 UPS's.
I power my system on and off all the time. I don't shut down when
lightening
storms are overhead and I never worry about the telephone lines or

cable.
But I live where the power wiring is fairly new ~15 years and its above
ground. If lightening is going to get you its going to get you. I have
heard claims that buried power and phone cables are susceptable to
problems
but I've never seen proof.

"Paul" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected]_s51, "Travis King"
wrote:

What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I

take
good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for
the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with

the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.

If the case temp is not excessive, the electrolytic caps should
be good for 10 years. Solder joints under stress, could be
anyone's guess (more likely to happen with a P4 retail heatsink
and its high clamping forces).

In ten years, you can expect several PSU failures, and any one of
those PSU failures could damage the motherboard.

If you have a lot of lightning storms, or bad quality power,
that could influence how long the mobo lasts. Look carefully
at any modem, cable modem, ADSL wires etc, to see if there are
any protection devices to take a (nearby) lightning hit, before
it gets to the motherboard. For example, on a phone line, there
may be a carbon block at the entry point, and you could enhance
that by using a second protection device nearer the computer.
For the really paranoid, a wireless network would reduce the
wiring exposure to just the power lines. A real ($1K purchase
price) UPS would reduce the risk of an AC power event from
getting you, and would help protect the PSU from getting
damaged. Cheap UPSes offer no protection at all, as they are
actually SPS (standby power supplies) - they are a "straight wire"
to power spikes, and the unit only cuts over to batteries if
the AC power dies for enough milliseconds.

On the motherboard itself, the Vcore circuit is the circuit under
the most stress. If the MOSFETs are cool to the touch, that is
a good sign. I've never read any MTBF estimates for switching
regulators on motherboards, so don't know whether they are
good for a 1 million hour MTBF or not.

Large BGA packages also have a rating, for solder joint
reliability. For example, a BGA with 750 pins, will last for
about 10 years, with a certain daily temperature variation.
From the Via web page:

* 552-pin BGA VT8366A North Bridge
* 376-pin BGA VT8233 South Bridge

so you have little risk of a failure there (caps will fail
first).

Handling the processor a lot (removal, regrease, reposition
heatsink) will cut into the life expectancy, if say the
processor gets cracked, and it happens to overload the Vcore
circuit. If the processor has the rubber bumpers on the top
of the chip, that will cut that risk a bit.

I would say your biggest exposure, is to external factors.

Paul







  #10  
Old January 12th 05, 08:29 PM
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "notritenoteri"
wrote:

MOst surge protectors aren't much good they just don't operate fast enough.
If U insist on protection a good UPS which convers AC to DC charges a
battery pack then provides AC out the other side with an inverter is the
best bet for my money. You can buy these in Canada where I am for about
$200. They have to be maintained and the batteries do go after about 5
years. As to RAID 1 I think you really need 4 drives, controller that is
smart and the software but maybe your definition is different than mine.


At the risk of starting one of those whiny surge protector threads,
the devices used can actually react fast enough. Some of them conduct
in nanoseconds. The problem is with the physics - it is hard to get
the dumped energy into the ground fast enough. Ground wiring is
a secondary consideration in building construction, and even adding
an extra extension cord to a surge protector can render it useless,
due to the inductance of the cord preventing the dumped energy from
getting to ground in time. (The Tripplite ISObar outlet has an
insurance policy, that in invalidated if another extension cord is
used with the product.)

As for the UPS, the UPS acronym is used rather carelessly by the
marketing people. Your typical cheap home UPS is actually an SPS.
An SPS has no filtering capability to speak of, and uses a relay
to switch operating modes. It looks like this:

SPS - Normal operation SPS - Battery operation

AC ---X---X----AC AC ---X X----AC
/
DC DC

You can tell an SPS, because it remains stone cold to the touch
while operating. After all, in normal operation, AC is just being
passed through the device, via a relay.

A real UPS looks like this, and the path stays the same
all the time:

AC -----DC------AC

Such a UPS gets warm/hot, because the inverter on the output
making the AC, dissipates energy just like the switcher inside
your ATX power supply. A real UPS typical costs $1K (for no
good reason that I can see).

Paul


"Mercury" wrote in message
...
Everything man makes turns to dust right?

I don't believe in tempting fate. There are plenty of low quality UPS and
surge protectors out there. I will generalise and say most low cost

consumer
stuff is complete rubbish until I am proven otherwise.You can have a

*good*
surge protector for as little as $US30. Many surge protectors are only

good
for 1 surge!A good true online UPS for an average power computer can cost
$US250 or less.

RAID 1 costs 1 extra disc drive and a controller capable. It will protect
you from drive failures.

There is no replacement for quality proven backups kept off-site. This is
most important.

My sisters house got blown by lightning - oven, fax, x computers, TV's

etc.
The only thing that worked afterwards was the traction engine.

Prevention is better than cure.



"notritenoteri" wrote in message
...
YOu want to worry about something? Worry about your data. Your MB is
obsolete, Your OS is obselescent and going obsolete and the only thing
that's of any value is your data. All the stuff about UPS's is theory.
Are
you running NASA and a lunar lander mission? If you are you should be

shot
for having only a single system. Given enough time EVERY piece of
equipment
will fail including $1000 UPS's.
I power my system on and off all the time. I don't shut down when
lightening
storms are overhead and I never worry about the telephone lines or

cable.
But I live where the power wiring is fairly new ~15 years and its above
ground. If lightening is going to get you its going to get you. I have
heard claims that buried power and phone cables are susceptable to
problems
but I've never seen proof.

"Paul" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected]_s51, "Travis King"
wrote:

What's probably the life expectancy of my A7V333 motherboard if I

take
good
care of it? It has 2 years on it right now. I run the computer for
the
most part constantly except when I leave town or do something with

the
inside of the computer. Current MB temperature is at 30 C.

If the case temp is not excessive, the electrolytic caps should
be good for 10 years. Solder joints under stress, could be
anyone's guess (more likely to happen with a P4 retail heatsink
and its high clamping forces).

In ten years, you can expect several PSU failures, and any one of
those PSU failures could damage the motherboard.

If you have a lot of lightning storms, or bad quality power,
that could influence how long the mobo lasts. Look carefully
at any modem, cable modem, ADSL wires etc, to see if there are
any protection devices to take a (nearby) lightning hit, before
it gets to the motherboard. For example, on a phone line, there
may be a carbon block at the entry point, and you could enhance
that by using a second protection device nearer the computer.
For the really paranoid, a wireless network would reduce the
wiring exposure to just the power lines. A real ($1K purchase
price) UPS would reduce the risk of an AC power event from
getting you, and would help protect the PSU from getting
damaged. Cheap UPSes offer no protection at all, as they are
actually SPS (standby power supplies) - they are a "straight wire"
to power spikes, and the unit only cuts over to batteries if
the AC power dies for enough milliseconds.

On the motherboard itself, the Vcore circuit is the circuit under
the most stress. If the MOSFETs are cool to the touch, that is
a good sign. I've never read any MTBF estimates for switching
regulators on motherboards, so don't know whether they are
good for a 1 million hour MTBF or not.

Large BGA packages also have a rating, for solder joint
reliability. For example, a BGA with 750 pins, will last for
about 10 years, with a certain daily temperature variation.
From the Via web page:

* 552-pin BGA VT8366A North Bridge
* 376-pin BGA VT8233 South Bridge

so you have little risk of a failure there (caps will fail
first).

Handling the processor a lot (removal, regrease, reposition
heatsink) will cut into the life expectancy, if say the
processor gets cracked, and it happens to overload the Vcore
circuit. If the processor has the rubber bumpers on the top
of the chip, that will cut that risk a bit.

I would say your biggest exposure, is to external factors.

Paul




 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cleaning CD & DVD drives [Was: What's the life expectancy of a DVD drive?] Phred Cdr 3 June 23rd 04 07:48 AM
USB Keyboards: Recommendations for & Life Expectancy of limner Homebuilt PC's 0 April 7th 04 01:59 AM
Life expectancy of a burner? farqua Cdr 6 January 29th 04 04:03 PM
Life expectancy of IDE disk Moonlit Homebuilt PC's 8 July 6th 03 07:00 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 HardwareBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.