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NF7-S power up problem



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 3rd 04, 02:57 AM
Jeff Green
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Posts: n/a
Default NF7-S power up problem

I have just installed a new NF7-S motherboard in my system. Every time I
shut down my computer won't power back up unless I disconnect the power
supply and re-connect it first. I tried to see if there was a bios setting
that might be causing it, but I don't see anything. Any suggestions are
appreciated. I'm guessing it's something simple, but I just haven't dealt
with it before.

JG

--
*****************************************
Jeff Green
**********************************************


  #2  
Old January 3rd 04, 03:56 AM
*Vanguard*
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jeff Green" said in :
I have just installed a new NF7-S motherboard in my system. Every
time I shut down my computer won't power back up unless I disconnect
the power supply and re-connect it first. I tried to see if there was
a bios setting that might be causing it, but I don't see anything.
Any suggestions are appreciated. I'm guessing it's something simple,
but I just haven't dealt with it before.

JG


I think pin 14 is the PS-ON line (green wire) that the motherboard should
short to prove to the power supply that the power connector has been
attached to a motherboard. Check if pin 14 in the header on the mobo is
shorted to one of the ground pins (I suppose it is possible they put a 10 to
100 ohm resistor in the line but the resistance should be very low; I've
never personally measured the resistance from pin 14 to a ground pin).

The NF7-S also is an ATX12V compliant mobo. That means the 4-pin power
square connector from the ATX12V power supply goes to the 4-pin power header
on the mobo. I thought that I read that the 12V connector wasn't an
absolute requirement -- except that the 20-pin power connector really cannot
supply enough amperes over its 12V lines to supply the higher powered AMD
processors. Attaching the power supply's 12V 4-pin power connector to the
mobo header lets the mobo distribute the 12V current over 3 lines. Do you
have an ATX12V power supply (i.e., does it have the 20-pin big power
connector along with a small 4-pin connector)? Or spend lots more money to
get an PSU tester for $15 to $25. A 10-ohm 10W resistor and a multimeter
work for me. But neither method substitutes for an oscilloscope to measure
ripple but I'm not going to waste my money on this pricey goody.

You might also try checking that you have the correct wires from the case
front panel to the header on the mobo. Make sure the pwr wires go to the
pwr pins and the reset wires to the reset pins.

Although pin 14 (PS-ON) tells the power supply it is connected (when shorted
by the mobo) to a motherboard, I've also heard some ATX power supplies
require some current draw to actually power up, like hooking it up to a hard
drive. Are you trying to bring up the power supply with it connected *only*
to the motherboard? I got a Fortron ATX12V model and it does come up when
the PS-ON line gets shorted to ground (but you really need to put a 10-ohm
10W load on each power line to ensure the voltage is valid under a load
rather than try to measure it with no load). If you just want to connect
the big (and small) power supply connectors to the mobo and not to the other
devices (i.e., drives) then put a 10-ohm 10W resistor accross the 12V and
ground wires for one of the 4-pin Molex connectors. You can get this at
Radio Shack.

The NF7-S has some LEDs on the bottom or left edge of the mobo. For me, one
lights up red and the other is green. There is no mention in the NF7 manual
as to what these LEDs are for. My guess is that the red LED indicates when
the special 5V line is powered (the ATX power supply will still supply this
special 5V as on when it is plugged in [and the switch on its backside, if
present, is in the ON position]). The LED tells you that the power supply
is supplying that 5V to the mobo (even when the system is "Off"). I don't
know what the green LED is supposed to indicate. Maybe it goes only when
the pwr switch is depressed and the power supply provides voltages on all
the other lines.

You don't mention how long the system stays up. If it stays up long enough
to go into the BIOS screens, then check under the PC Health menu to see what
voltages are listed. Maybe you haven't bothered to install a CPU yet or
don't have it properly seated with thermal paste/pad to the heatsink and a
fan. The BIOS might be set to shutdown the system if the CPU temp is too
high or if the CPU fan's RPM is too low.

--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________


  #3  
Old January 4th 04, 01:57 AM
Jeff Green
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Everything is connected, near as I can tell, properly, including the four
pin power connector. I guess I was a little vague as to the sequence. I
double-check the wiring of the power switch to make sure it's on the right
jumpers. The machine works fine. Runs fine. I can run all my programs and
everything a good computer should be. Never gives me a hiccup when it's
running. Problem is, if my toddler daughter sneaks in and shuts off the
computer with the power button - it won't start back up with the button
unless I physically unplug the whole machine, wait until the red LED light
is off, and then plug it back in. Then it starts up fine. Not sure why I'd
have to power it down completely to get it to work correctly - fiddled with
most of the BIOS power management settings settings and it still seems to
happen.

JG

"*Vanguard*" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s53...
"Jeff Green" said in :
I have just installed a new NF7-S motherboard in my system. Every
time I shut down my computer won't power back up unless I disconnect
the power supply and re-connect it first. I tried to see if there was
a bios setting that might be causing it, but I don't see anything.
Any suggestions are appreciated. I'm guessing it's something simple,
but I just haven't dealt with it before.

JG


I think pin 14 is the PS-ON line (green wire) that the motherboard should
short to prove to the power supply that the power connector has been
attached to a motherboard. Check if pin 14 in the header on the mobo is
shorted to one of the ground pins (I suppose it is possible they put a 10

to
100 ohm resistor in the line but the resistance should be very low; I've
never personally measured the resistance from pin 14 to a ground pin).

The NF7-S also is an ATX12V compliant mobo. That means the 4-pin power
square connector from the ATX12V power supply goes to the 4-pin power

header
on the mobo. I thought that I read that the 12V connector wasn't an
absolute requirement -- except that the 20-pin power connector really

cannot
supply enough amperes over its 12V lines to supply the higher powered AMD
processors. Attaching the power supply's 12V 4-pin power connector to the
mobo header lets the mobo distribute the 12V current over 3 lines. Do you
have an ATX12V power supply (i.e., does it have the 20-pin big power
connector along with a small 4-pin connector)? Or spend lots more money

to
get an PSU tester for $15 to $25. A 10-ohm 10W resistor and a multimeter
work for me. But neither method substitutes for an oscilloscope to

measure
ripple but I'm not going to waste my money on this pricey goody.

You might also try checking that you have the correct wires from the case
front panel to the header on the mobo. Make sure the pwr wires go to the
pwr pins and the reset wires to the reset pins.

Although pin 14 (PS-ON) tells the power supply it is connected (when

shorted
by the mobo) to a motherboard, I've also heard some ATX power supplies
require some current draw to actually power up, like hooking it up to a

hard
drive. Are you trying to bring up the power supply with it connected

*only*
to the motherboard? I got a Fortron ATX12V model and it does come up when
the PS-ON line gets shorted to ground (but you really need to put a 10-ohm
10W load on each power line to ensure the voltage is valid under a load
rather than try to measure it with no load). If you just want to connect
the big (and small) power supply connectors to the mobo and not to the

other
devices (i.e., drives) then put a 10-ohm 10W resistor accross the 12V and
ground wires for one of the 4-pin Molex connectors. You can get this at
Radio Shack.

The NF7-S has some LEDs on the bottom or left edge of the mobo. For me,

one
lights up red and the other is green. There is no mention in the NF7

manual
as to what these LEDs are for. My guess is that the red LED indicates

when
the special 5V line is powered (the ATX power supply will still supply

this
special 5V as on when it is plugged in [and the switch on its backside, if
present, is in the ON position]). The LED tells you that the power supply
is supplying that 5V to the mobo (even when the system is "Off"). I don't
know what the green LED is supposed to indicate. Maybe it goes only when
the pwr switch is depressed and the power supply provides voltages on all
the other lines.

You don't mention how long the system stays up. If it stays up long

enough
to go into the BIOS screens, then check under the PC Health menu to see

what
voltages are listed. Maybe you haven't bothered to install a CPU yet or
don't have it properly seated with thermal paste/pad to the heatsink and a
fan. The BIOS might be set to shutdown the system if the CPU temp is too
high or if the CPU fan's RPM is too low.

--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________




  #4  
Old January 4th 04, 11:08 AM
*Vanguard*
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jeff Green" said in :
Everything is connected, near as I can tell, properly, including the
four pin power connector. I guess I was a little vague as to the
sequence. I double-check the wiring of the power switch to make sure
it's on the right jumpers. The machine works fine. Runs fine. I can
run all my programs and everything a good computer should be. Never
gives me a hiccup when it's running. Problem is, if my toddler
daughter sneaks in and shuts off the computer with the power button -
it won't start back up with the button unless I physically unplug the
whole machine, wait until the red LED light is off, and then plug it
back in. Then it starts up fine. Not sure why I'd have to power it
down completely to get it to work correctly - fiddled with most of
the BIOS power management settings settings and it still seems to
happen.

JG

"*Vanguard*" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s53...
"Jeff Green" said in :
I have just installed a new NF7-S motherboard in my system. Every
time I shut down my computer won't power back up unless I disconnect
the power supply and re-connect it first. I tried to see if there
was a bios setting that might be causing it, but I don't see
anything. Any suggestions are appreciated. I'm guessing it's
something simple, but I just haven't dealt with it before.

JG


I think pin 14 is the PS-ON line (green wire) that the motherboard
should short to prove to the power supply that the power connector
has been attached to a motherboard. Check if pin 14 in the header
on the mobo is shorted to one of the ground pins (I suppose it is
possible they put a 10 to 100 ohm resistor in the line but the
resistance should be very low; I've never personally measured the
resistance from pin 14 to a ground pin).

The NF7-S also is an ATX12V compliant mobo. That means the 4-pin
power square connector from the ATX12V power supply goes to the
4-pin power header on the mobo. I thought that I read that the 12V
connector wasn't an absolute requirement -- except that the 20-pin
power connector really cannot supply enough amperes over its 12V
lines to supply the higher powered AMD processors. Attaching the
power supply's 12V 4-pin power connector to the mobo header lets the
mobo distribute the 12V current over 3 lines. Do you have an ATX12V
power supply (i.e., does it have the 20-pin big power connector
along with a small 4-pin connector)? Or spend lots more money to
get an PSU tester for $15 to $25. A 10-ohm 10W resistor and a
multimeter work for me. But neither method substitutes for an
oscilloscope to measure ripple but I'm not going to waste my money
on this pricey goody.

You might also try checking that you have the correct wires from the
case front panel to the header on the mobo. Make sure the pwr wires
go to the pwr pins and the reset wires to the reset pins.

Although pin 14 (PS-ON) tells the power supply it is connected (when
shorted by the mobo) to a motherboard, I've also heard some ATX
power supplies require some current draw to actually power up, like
hooking it up to a hard drive. Are you trying to bring up the power
supply with it connected *only* to the motherboard? I got a Fortron
ATX12V model and it does come up when the PS-ON line gets shorted to
ground (but you really need to put a 10-ohm 10W load on each power
line to ensure the voltage is valid under a load rather than try to
measure it with no load). If you just want to connect the big (and
small) power supply connectors to the mobo and not to the other
devices (i.e., drives) then put a 10-ohm 10W resistor accross the
12V and ground wires for one of the 4-pin Molex connectors. You can
get this at Radio Shack.

The NF7-S has some LEDs on the bottom or left edge of the mobo. For
me, one lights up red and the other is green. There is no mention
in the NF7 manual as to what these LEDs are for. My guess is that
the red LED indicates when the special 5V line is powered (the ATX
power supply will still supply this special 5V as on when it is
plugged in [and the switch on its backside, if present, is in the ON
position]). The LED tells you that the power supply is supplying
that 5V to the mobo (even when the system is "Off"). I don't know
what the green LED is supposed to indicate. Maybe it goes only when
the pwr switch is depressed and the power supply provides voltages
on all the other lines.

You don't mention how long the system stays up. If it stays up long
enough to go into the BIOS screens, then check under the PC Health
menu to see what voltages are listed. Maybe you haven't bothered to
install a CPU yet or don't have it properly seated with thermal
paste/pad to the heatsink and a fan. The BIOS might be set to
shutdown the system if the CPU temp is too high or if the CPU fan's
RPM is too low.

--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________


Try clearing the CMOS (and then reset all your customized settings). In the
BIOS, set the power button to the 4-second delay mode (rather than the
instant off setting).

Depending on you version of Windows (which you didn't mention), under the
Power Options settings, see if you can configure the power button to either
go into Standby mode or do nothing.

It could be that you are already configured to have Windows go into Standby
or Hibernate mode when the power button is pressed. However, some machines
really aren't compliant, especially in regards to the daughtercards you
insert into the slots. Sometimes the drivers won't work. My prior computer
had a problem that I could not let the hard drives spin down - because they
wouldn't spin back up. So I configured the monitor only to power down and
leave the hard drives spinning and to never go into Standby mode. In fact,
on the NF7-S mobo that I have now, sometimes the Standby will fail, report
the driver that is preventing going into Standby mode (like the HP DeskJet's
driver), and stay in full-power on mode. I haven't tried Hibernate mode
yet. On my prior computer, that would lock it up. Since the power button
was configured to bounce in and out of Standby mode, it wouldn't help to get
me out of that stuck Hibernate mode.

So see if you can configure the power button under Power Options to do
nothing. I haven't used that setting. Maybe then hitting the power button
actually does nothing (which means you'll have to use the Start menu to
shutdown). Otherwise, see if you are using Hibernate mode; if so, don't use
it and instead just have the computer go into Standby mode.


--
__________________________________________________ __________
*** Post replies to newsgroup. E-mail is not accepted. ***
__________________________________________________ __________


  #5  
Old January 11th 04, 09:10 PM
GargoyleBG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jeff Green wrote in message
...
I have just installed a new NF7-S motherboard in my system. Every time I
shut down my computer won't power back up unless I disconnect the power
supply and re-connect it first. I tried to see if there was a bios setting
that might be causing it, but I don't see anything. Any suggestions are
appreciated. I'm guessing it's something simple, but I just haven't dealt
with it before.

JG


I have the same problem with 1800+, not overclocked, I spent arround 12h+
for installing harware and trying to make it work, also screwing my
brother's WinXP install on his computer, here's what I get:

cold boot:

can't get into BIOS if I don't disconnect my HDD's power, when I unplug it,
I can enter BIOS, also get past table like where it lists IRQs, memory banks
and other stuff, when I get wrong system disk(like non-boot diskette during
floppy boot) I plug HDD power and it works fine - windows loading and so on

PSU is 400W+, only CPU, 40Gb WD 7200rpm disk, 2x256Mb DDR ram




  #6  
Old January 12th 04, 04:10 PM
Al Kaufmann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This comes under the category of a suggestion: Use the jumper to
clear the CMOS and then place the jumper back in the normal position.
Enter the bios and load the bios defaults and then before saving go
through every option in the bios and set it as you require. Save and
I hope that works.

Ak


"GargoyleBG" wrote:

Jeff Green wrote in message
...
I have just installed a new NF7-S motherboard in my system. Every time I
shut down my computer won't power back up unless I disconnect the power
supply and re-connect it first. I tried to see if there was a bios setting
that might be causing it, but I don't see anything. Any suggestions are
appreciated. I'm guessing it's something simple, but I just haven't dealt
with it before.

JG


I have the same problem with 1800+, not overclocked, I spent arround 12h+
for installing harware and trying to make it work, also screwing my
brother's WinXP install on his computer, here's what I get:

cold boot:

can't get into BIOS if I don't disconnect my HDD's power, when I unplug it,
I can enter BIOS, also get past table like where it lists IRQs, memory banks
and other stuff, when I get wrong system disk(like non-boot diskette during
floppy boot) I plug HDD power and it works fine - windows loading and so on

PSU is 400W+, only CPU, 40Gb WD 7200rpm disk, 2x256Mb DDR ram




  #7  
Old January 12th 04, 08:09 PM
GargoyleBG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Al Kaufmann wrote in message
...
This comes under the category of a suggestion: Use the jumper to
clear the CMOS and then place the jumper back in the normal position.
Enter the bios and load the bios defaults and then before saving go
through every option in the bios and set it as you require. Save and
I hope that works.

Ak


seems that it's my Western Digital HDD is somewhat incompartible with that
Mobo, I installed latest .22 BIOS, but haven't shut down power yet, my pc
runs 24/7


  #8  
Old January 13th 04, 02:26 PM
Al Kaufmann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Are you trying to boot from a SATA drive? If so the .22 bios may be
the problem. I boot from a SATA raid drive and it would not start up
with that bios, I had to go back to the .19 bios.

There is a modded bios out there, I have not used but you may want to
have a look at it.

http://forum.abit-usa.com/showthread...threadid=35222

Ak

"GargoyleBG" wrote:

Al Kaufmann wrote in message
.. .
This comes under the category of a suggestion: Use the jumper to
clear the CMOS and then place the jumper back in the normal position.
Enter the bios and load the bios defaults and then before saving go
through every option in the bios and set it as you require. Save and
I hope that works.

Ak


seems that it's my Western Digital HDD is somewhat incompartible with that
Mobo, I installed latest .22 BIOS, but haven't shut down power yet, my pc
runs 24/7


  #9  
Old January 13th 04, 08:38 PM
GargoyleBG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

nop, it was .19 BIOS and my disk is only ATA100


  #10  
Old January 18th 04, 07:06 PM
molasses
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have exactly the same problem, but perhaps of my own making.

I have an NF7S-v2, Barton 2500+ (but I select 3200+ ie run with the
200MHz FSB), 512Mb DDR 3200 Crucial (Non ECC, Non parity,
unbufferred), Maxtor SATA 160Gb HD, ATI 9800SE AIW, and a cheap 400+W
PSU (designed, but not approved for P4 with the secondary connector).

My only added observation is that when I do reboot and go back to the
BIOS the FSB speed has sometimes (perhaps always) been set down to
100MHz.

A friend mentioned that there was some trick with the reset switch,
pressing it three times in quick succession to lower the bus speed
when overclocking, could this be related?
 




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