A computer components & hardware forum. HardwareBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » HardwareBanter forum » General Hardware & Peripherals » General
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Maxtor hard drives - don't surface scan!



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 21st 03, 02:25 AM
CK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Maxtor hard drives - don't surface scan!

Just a quick note to describe my (admittedly limited) experience with my
Maxtor hard drives and Windows. It seems that Windows, and DOS for that
matter, don't play nice with my 80Gig Maxtor hard drives. Under normal
circumstances, they are perfectly happy together. But as soon as Windows
wants to get down and dirty and check the hard drives surface the hard drive
wants none of it.

I originally bought an 80gig drive a couple of years ago. I believe that it
arrived with a flaw, which then was made worse by the fact that I was trying
to do MS-based things to it - FDISK's verification process, specifically,
which I believe is more-or-less the same as Scandisk's surface scan. While I
was running FSISK, it started having problems. Then there was a horrible
clicking noise, and then there were bad clusters all over the place. The
hard drive was getting eaten up by the process, so I downloaded Maxtor's own
utilities. It was already too late for that drive by that point (the utility
hadn't come with the hard drive), so I got a replacement and used Maxtor's
utility this time to set the drive up - with no problems.

I was reminded of this whole episode this evening. Windows decided on
booting that the drive might have bad clusters, and proceeded to do a
surface check. It found a bad cluster, and then started hunting deeper. It
found a couple and was going rather slowly, so given my earlier experiences
I stopped it from carrying on and used Maxtor's utility again to check it.
It found problems with the START, but the Advanced test was able to fix it.
On a reboot Windows Scandisk flew through the check with no further
problems.

I am of the opinion that with my particular model of hard drive the Windows
surface scan utilities will only make any problems worse. Like picking at a
scab will stop it from healing. It seems reasonably likely to me that this
is also the case with other Maxtor hard drives, and perhaps those of other
manufacturers. I would strongly advise against letting Windows do a surface
scan under any circumstances in which there might be a problem, and instead
use the utilities supplied by the manufacturer of the hard drive.

Perhaps I am extrapolating unnecessarily, but I thought I should share my
experiences to prevent others from having to go through the frustrating
episode that I did.

CK

--
"I'm not like them, but I can pretend..."


  #2  
Old August 21st 03, 04:25 AM
Phrederik
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I originally bought an 80gig drive a couple of years ago. I believe
that it
arrived with a flaw, which then was made worse by the fact that I

was trying
to do MS-based things to it - FDISK's verification process,

specifically,
which I believe is more-or-less the same as Scandisk's surface scan.

While I
was running FSISK, it started having problems. Then there was a

horrible
clicking noise, and then there were bad clusters all over the place.

The
hard drive was getting eaten up by the process, so I downloaded

Maxtor's own
utilities. It was already too late for that drive by that point (the

utility
hadn't come with the hard drive), so I got a replacement and used

Maxtor's
utility this time to set the drive up - with no problems.


FDisk would NOT damage a drive unless the drive was already defective,
or you had your BIOS settings wrong and overstepped the drive. I'm
pretty sure that todays drives won't let you actually do damage by
overstepping, either.

I was reminded of this whole episode this evening. Windows decided

on
booting that the drive might have bad clusters, and proceeded to do

a
surface check. It found a bad cluster, and then started hunting

deeper. It
found a couple and was going rather slowly, so given my earlier

experiences
I stopped it from carrying on and used Maxtor's utility again to

check it.
It found problems with the START, but the Advanced test was able to

fix it.
On a reboot Windows Scandisk flew through the check with no further
problems.


Scandisk can scramble the data on a hard drive, especially if there
are other issues (bad power, bad cable, etc.) but it won't physically
damage a drive.

I am of the opinion that with my particular model of hard drive the

Windows
surface scan utilities will only make any problems worse. Like

picking at a
scab will stop it from healing. It seems reasonably likely to me

that this
is also the case with other Maxtor hard drives, and perhaps those of

other
manufacturers. I would strongly advise against letting Windows do a

surface
scan under any circumstances in which there might be a problem, and

instead
use the utilities supplied by the manufacturer of the hard drive.


Nope. Scandisk may find defects, but it won't create them.


  #3  
Old August 22nd 03, 12:52 AM
CK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

snip my initial ramblings /snip

FDisk would NOT damage a drive unless the drive was already defective,


That's what I said, isn't it? That the drive was already defective. My point
was that fdisk appeared to make it worse in a way that Maxtor's own utility
didn't.

or you had your BIOS settings wrong and overstepped the drive. I'm
pretty sure that todays drives won't let you actually do damage by
overstepping, either.

The BIOS settings were fine.

snip some more recent experiences /snip

Scandisk can scramble the data on a hard drive, especially if there
are other issues (bad power, bad cable, etc.) but it won't physically
damage a drive.


Out of interest, does anyone here know how the surface scan actually works?

I am of the opinion that with my particular model of hard drive the

Windows
surface scan utilities will only make any problems worse. Like

picking at a
scab will stop it from healing. It seems reasonably likely to me

that this
is also the case with other Maxtor hard drives, and perhaps those of

other
manufacturers. I would strongly advise against letting Windows do a

surface
scan under any circumstances in which there might be a problem, and

instead
use the utilities supplied by the manufacturer of the hard drive.


Nope. Scandisk may find defects, but it won't create them.

See, now that's where I don't agree. There were some horrible noises coming
out of the original drive during the surface scan. Given the mechanical
abuse that appeared to be happening during the process, I don't think it's
likely that no damage came about.


  #4  
Old August 22nd 03, 10:45 AM
Phrederik
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"CK" wrote in message
...
snip my initial ramblings /snip

FDisk would NOT damage a drive unless the drive was already defective,


That's what I said, isn't it? That the drive was already defective. My

point
was that fdisk appeared to make it worse in a way that Maxtor's own

utility
didn't.

or you had your BIOS settings wrong and overstepped the drive. I'm
pretty sure that todays drives won't let you actually do damage by
overstepping, either.

The BIOS settings were fine.

snip some more recent experiences /snip

Scandisk can scramble the data on a hard drive, especially if there
are other issues (bad power, bad cable, etc.) but it won't physically
damage a drive.


Out of interest, does anyone here know how the surface scan actually

works?

A surface scan simply reads every sector one at a time, whether it is empty
or has data in it. (Technically, all sectors have data... some of it just
isn't useful). If the scan tries to read a sector that is damaged, you'll
hear the head jumping all over (zipping to track zero and back) trying to
ensure good alignment. A surface scan does nothing different than copying a
file or running a program. If a surface scan does physical damage, the drive
was ready to fail anyhow.

I am of the opinion that with my particular model of hard drive the

Windows
surface scan utilities will only make any problems worse. Like

picking at a
scab will stop it from healing. It seems reasonably likely to me

that this
is also the case with other Maxtor hard drives, and perhaps those of

other
manufacturers. I would strongly advise against letting Windows do a

surface
scan under any circumstances in which there might be a problem, and

instead
use the utilities supplied by the manufacturer of the hard drive.


Nope. Scandisk may find defects, but it won't create them.

See, now that's where I don't agree. There were some horrible noises

coming
out of the original drive during the surface scan. Given the mechanical
abuse that appeared to be happening during the process, I don't think it's
likely that no damage came about.


Imagine having a 10gig file on your hard drive. Copy it to another location.
Everthing that a surface scan does will happen during the copy. The only
difference is that the surface scan is more likely to find a bad sector and
start zipping back and forth from the current track to track zero.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Intel 875PBZ, anyone? Adrian General 22 July 26th 03 06:31 PM
Cd-rom drives not detected Gaffer General 1 July 25th 03 12:17 AM
newb questions about SCSI hard drives fred.do General 7 June 26th 03 01:59 AM
ZIP drives and the dreaded 'click' Ron Cook General 2 June 25th 03 03:32 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 HardwareBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.