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How to overclock Celery566 w/ MSI mobo?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 10th 04, 08:21 PM
noob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to overclock Celery566 w/ MSI mobo?

I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in. However,
the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB to 68/34 or
75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?

This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed in its
overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??


  #2  
Old January 10th 04, 10:56 PM
~misfit~
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

noob wrote:
I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in.


Is that a coppermine celly?

However, the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB
to 68/34 or 75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?


By jumper perhaps? However, if it isn't a coppermine and there is no
facility for raising the vcore then you have no chance.

This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed
in its overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??


A lot depends on what revision your mobo is. That board came out in several
different flavours ranging from 1.0 revision through to 5.x and they vary
considerably in what they are capable of.

Ok, just done some home-work, it has to be a coppermine celly as the board
doesn't support earlier CPUs. MSI state that the board supports a FSB of
66/100/133 so I'm assuming it'll be by jumper. If you don't have the manual
and want to download it go he

http://www.msi.com.tw/program/suppor...ail.php?UID=21

HTH.
--
~misfit~


  #3  
Old January 11th 04, 12:14 AM
noob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"~misfit~" wrote in message
...
noob wrote:
I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in.


Is that a coppermine celly?

However, the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB
to 68/34 or 75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?


By jumper perhaps? However, if it isn't a coppermine and there is no
facility for raising the vcore then you have no chance.

This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed
in its overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??


A lot depends on what revision your mobo is. That board came out in

several
different flavours ranging from 1.0 revision through to 5.x and they vary
considerably in what they are capable of.


It's version 5.

Ok, just done some home-work, it has to be a coppermine celly as the board
doesn't support earlier CPUs. MSI state that the board supports a FSB of
66/100/133 so I'm assuming it'll be by jumper. If you don't have the

manual
and want to download it go he

http://www.msi.com.tw/program/suppor...ail.php?UID=21


No jumpers available. Only jumpers on the board are for clearing CMOS and
enabling front audio ports.

In the BIOS, under Frequency/Voltage control, there are three options:
1. Autodetect DIMM/PCI clock (enabled or disabled)
2. Spread Spectrum (enabled or disabled)
3. CPU Host / PCI clock (default, 66/33, 68/34, 75/37)

MSI says it automatically detects CPU clock (which is 66Mhz).... maybe
that's why it isn't letting me go to 100Mhz FSB? Maybe MSI's allowed
overclock is limited to 14% or something weird like that....

Would raising the vCore change what MSI sees as the CPU clock or allows for
overclocking? I can raise it to 1.75v by wrapping a coupla pins on the
processor.

Right now, I have it running at 8.5x75 for 638Mhz. I understand most folks
are running these at 8.5x100 for 850Mhz. I'd like to know how to get it
to run at 100Mhz with this MSI mobo.... maybe time for an email to MSI
(doubt they'll help, though).


  #4  
Old January 11th 04, 07:39 AM
David Maynard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

noob wrote:
"~misfit~" wrote in message
...

noob wrote:

I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in.


Is that a coppermine celly?


However, the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB
to 68/34 or 75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?


By jumper perhaps? However, if it isn't a coppermine and there is no
facility for raising the vcore then you have no chance.


This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed
in its overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??


A lot depends on what revision your mobo is. That board came out in


several

different flavours ranging from 1.0 revision through to 5.x and they vary
considerably in what they are capable of.



It's version 5.


Ok, just done some home-work, it has to be a coppermine celly as the board
doesn't support earlier CPUs. MSI state that the board supports a FSB of
66/100/133 so I'm assuming it'll be by jumper. If you don't have the


manual

and want to download it go he

http://www.msi.com.tw/program/suppor...ail.php?UID=21



No jumpers available. Only jumpers on the board are for clearing CMOS and
enabling front audio ports.

In the BIOS, under Frequency/Voltage control, there are three options:
1. Autodetect DIMM/PCI clock (enabled or disabled)
2. Spread Spectrum (enabled or disabled)
3. CPU Host / PCI clock (default, 66/33, 68/34, 75/37)

MSI says it automatically detects CPU clock (which is 66Mhz).... maybe
that's why it isn't letting me go to 100Mhz FSB? Maybe MSI's allowed
overclock is limited to 14% or something weird like that....


This seems to be a common 'feature' of some BIOS versions. For some reason
they get it into their head no one would want to encroach on the next
legitimate FSB so the only options they allow are 'up to' the next
'automatic' setting. In your case, whatever FSB choices they have available
up to 100 MHz FSB, since that's the next 'legitimate' one.

My chaintechs do the same thing but, as irritating as it is, they at least
have the FSB jumpers to over-ride the CPU.


Would raising the vCore change what MSI sees as the CPU clock or allows for
overclocking? I can raise it to 1.75v by wrapping a coupla pins on the
processor.


Changing Vcore isn't going to make it 'think' it's a different processor.
The BSel pins on the processor tell the motherboard what FSB to run at and
that's what it will run at unless the BIOS has some option to over-ride it.

What you need to do is isolate the Bsel0 pin (AJ33) so it goes high and
tells the motherboard it wants 100 MHz FSB.


Right now, I have it running at 8.5x75 for 638Mhz. I understand most folks
are running these at 8.5x100 for 850Mhz. I'd like to know how to get it
to run at 100Mhz with this MSI mobo.... maybe time for an email to MSI
(doubt they'll help, though).



  #5  
Old January 11th 04, 04:37 PM
noob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"David Maynard" wrote in message
...
noob wrote:
"~misfit~" wrote in message
...

noob wrote:

I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in.

Is that a coppermine celly?


However, the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB
to 68/34 or 75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?

By jumper perhaps? However, if it isn't a coppermine and there is no
facility for raising the vcore then you have no chance.


This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed
in its overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??

A lot depends on what revision your mobo is. That board came out in


several

different flavours ranging from 1.0 revision through to 5.x and they

vary
considerably in what they are capable of.



It's version 5.


Ok, just done some home-work, it has to be a coppermine celly as the

board
doesn't support earlier CPUs. MSI state that the board supports a FSB of
66/100/133 so I'm assuming it'll be by jumper. If you don't have the


manual

and want to download it go he


http://www.msi.com.tw/program/suppor...ail.php?UID=21


No jumpers available. Only jumpers on the board are for clearing CMOS

and
enabling front audio ports.

In the BIOS, under Frequency/Voltage control, there are three options:
1. Autodetect DIMM/PCI clock (enabled or disabled)
2. Spread Spectrum (enabled or disabled)
3. CPU Host / PCI clock (default, 66/33, 68/34, 75/37)

MSI says it automatically detects CPU clock (which is 66Mhz).... maybe
that's why it isn't letting me go to 100Mhz FSB? Maybe MSI's allowed
overclock is limited to 14% or something weird like that....


This seems to be a common 'feature' of some BIOS versions. For some reason
they get it into their head no one would want to encroach on the next
legitimate FSB so the only options they allow are 'up to' the next
'automatic' setting. In your case, whatever FSB choices they have

available
up to 100 MHz FSB, since that's the next 'legitimate' one.

My chaintechs do the same thing but, as irritating as it is, they at least
have the FSB jumpers to over-ride the CPU.


Would raising the vCore change what MSI sees as the CPU clock or allows

for
overclocking? I can raise it to 1.75v by wrapping a coupla pins on the
processor.


Changing Vcore isn't going to make it 'think' it's a different processor.
The BSel pins on the processor tell the motherboard what FSB to run at and
that's what it will run at unless the BIOS has some option to over-ride

it.

What you need to do is isolate the Bsel0 pin (AJ33) so it goes high and
tells the motherboard it wants 100 MHz FSB.


Got it, thanks!! I found a web reference here
http://www.dualcpu.jp/fcpga-pin.html
There doesn't seem to be much material on the web about this.....

I wonder if I should go ahead and raise the vCore while I'm at it?
I'm running a spare Vantec Aeroflow on it, so it should have plenty of
cooling.

What do you recommend for isolating the pin? Any ideas?


Right now, I have it running at 8.5x75 for 638Mhz. I understand most

folks
are running these at 8.5x100 for 850Mhz. I'd like to know how to get

it
to run at 100Mhz with this MSI mobo.... maybe time for an email to MSI
(doubt they'll help, though).





  #6  
Old January 12th 04, 02:19 AM
David Maynard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

noob wrote:
"David Maynard" wrote in message
...

noob wrote:

"~misfit~" wrote in message
...


noob wrote:


I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in.

Is that a coppermine celly?



However, the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB
to 68/34 or 75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?

By jumper perhaps? However, if it isn't a coppermine and there is no
facility for raising the vcore then you have no chance.



This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed
in its overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??

A lot depends on what revision your mobo is. That board came out in

several


different flavours ranging from 1.0 revision through to 5.x and they

vary

considerably in what they are capable of.


It's version 5.



Ok, just done some home-work, it has to be a coppermine celly as the

board

doesn't support earlier CPUs. MSI state that the board supports a FSB of
66/100/133 so I'm assuming it'll be by jumper. If you don't have the

manual


and want to download it go he


http://www.msi.com.tw/program/suppor...ail.php?UID=21


No jumpers available. Only jumpers on the board are for clearing CMOS


and

enabling front audio ports.

In the BIOS, under Frequency/Voltage control, there are three options:
1. Autodetect DIMM/PCI clock (enabled or disabled)
2. Spread Spectrum (enabled or disabled)
3. CPU Host / PCI clock (default, 66/33, 68/34, 75/37)

MSI says it automatically detects CPU clock (which is 66Mhz).... maybe
that's why it isn't letting me go to 100Mhz FSB? Maybe MSI's allowed
overclock is limited to 14% or something weird like that....


This seems to be a common 'feature' of some BIOS versions. For some reason
they get it into their head no one would want to encroach on the next
legitimate FSB so the only options they allow are 'up to' the next
'automatic' setting. In your case, whatever FSB choices they have


available

up to 100 MHz FSB, since that's the next 'legitimate' one.

My chaintechs do the same thing but, as irritating as it is, they at least
have the FSB jumpers to over-ride the CPU.



Would raising the vCore change what MSI sees as the CPU clock or allows


for

overclocking? I can raise it to 1.75v by wrapping a coupla pins on the
processor.


Changing Vcore isn't going to make it 'think' it's a different processor.
The BSel pins on the processor tell the motherboard what FSB to run at and
that's what it will run at unless the BIOS has some option to over-ride


it.

What you need to do is isolate the Bsel0 pin (AJ33) so it goes high and
tells the motherboard it wants 100 MHz FSB.



Got it, thanks!! I found a web reference here
http://www.dualcpu.jp/fcpga-pin.html
There doesn't seem to be much material on the web about this.....


It's on old 'trick' that originated with the slot-1 celerons, except it was
easier to tape the connector pin than it is to isolate the same thing on
the PPGA and FC-PGA chip carrier. It's not 'common' now because most third
party 'modern' motherboards provide some way to do it, with either the BIOS
or jumpers, and I'm a bit surprised that the MSI doesn't.


I wonder if I should go ahead and raise the vCore while I'm at it?


It's likely you'll need a bit of a Vcore boost.

Odds are it'll run 112 MHz FSB too, assuming you have memory that'll do it.
Mine made it to 120Mhz FSB for 1020.

I'm running a spare Vantec Aeroflow on it, so it should have plenty of
cooling.

What do you recommend for isolating the pin? Any ideas?


Well, there are a number of 'ideas' that have been promulgated. One is to
'paint' it with either nail polish or super glue. The one I remember seeing
was to use the bottom end of a ball-point pen, the guts removed, fill it
with the 'paint' and then slide it over the pin so it gets coated. I've
never tried that so lord knows if it works, or simply slops goop all over
everything. Another is to wallow out the CPU socket, so there's more room,
and then slide a real thin insulation, like stripped from a wire wrap wire,
over the processor pin before inserting it into the socket. Another I saw
was to remove the socket top, cut a small piece of tape and insert it in
the contact in the socket, and then put the top back on. The idea with
these is to leave the processor 'like new' to save the warrantee and avoid
a 'boo-boo' destroying it (although if one 'boo-boos' on wallowing out the
wrong socket pin you've ruined the motherboard so it's not 'risk free' either).

I take the direct approach and simply break the appropriate pin off the
chip carrier but you're screwed if you go cross-eyed and break off the
wrong one, although P2B in here seems to have mastered some form of voo-doo
that enabled him to actually solder pins back on one of his. Seems unlikely
to me that mere mortals should count on replicating that feat, though.

A variation on that would be to buy an adapter socket and break the pin off
of it rather than the processor but with FC-PGA celerons, up to 700Mhz,
going for under 25 bucks it's not much cheaper to replace in the event of a
'boo-boo' and it adds the up front cost of the socket even without a
'boo-boo'. On the other hand, maybe one of the adapters has a jumper inside
it to isolate the pin. I haven't checked for that since, as I mentioned, I
do the direct pin break.


Right now, I have it running at 8.5x75 for 638Mhz. I understand most


folks

are running these at 8.5x100 for 850Mhz. I'd like to know how to get


it

to run at 100Mhz with this MSI mobo.... maybe time for an email to MSI
(doubt they'll help, though).







  #7  
Old January 12th 04, 03:54 AM
noob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"David Maynard" wrote in message
...
Got it, thanks!! I found a web reference here
http://www.dualcpu.jp/fcpga-pin.html
There doesn't seem to be much material on the web about this.....


It's on old 'trick' that originated with the slot-1 celerons, except it

was
easier to tape the connector pin than it is to isolate the same thing on
the PPGA and FC-PGA chip carrier. It's not 'common' now because most third
party 'modern' motherboards provide some way to do it, with either the

BIOS
or jumpers, and I'm a bit surprised that the MSI doesn't.


I wonder if I should go ahead and raise the vCore while I'm at it?


It's likely you'll need a bit of a Vcore boost.

Odds are it'll run 112 MHz FSB too, assuming you have memory that'll do

it.
Mine made it to 120Mhz FSB for 1020.


What voltage did you run yours at?


I'm running a spare Vantec Aeroflow on it, so it should have plenty of
cooling.

What do you recommend for isolating the pin? Any ideas?


Well, there are a number of 'ideas' that have been promulgated. One is to
'paint' it with either nail polish or super glue. The one I remember

seeing
was to use the bottom end of a ball-point pen, the guts removed, fill it
with the 'paint' and then slide it over the pin so it gets coated. I've
never tried that so lord knows if it works, or simply slops goop all over
everything. Another is to wallow out the CPU socket, so there's more room,
and then slide a real thin insulation, like stripped from a wire wrap

wire,
over the processor pin before inserting it into the socket. Another I saw
was to remove the socket top, cut a small piece of tape and insert it in
the contact in the socket, and then put the top back on. The idea with
these is to leave the processor 'like new' to save the warrantee and avoid
a 'boo-boo' destroying it (although if one 'boo-boos' on wallowing out the
wrong socket pin you've ruined the motherboard so it's not 'risk free'

either).

I take the direct approach and simply break the appropriate pin off the
chip carrier but you're screwed if you go cross-eyed and break off the
wrong one, although P2B in here seems to have mastered some form of

voo-doo
that enabled him to actually solder pins back on one of his. Seems

unlikely
to me that mere mortals should count on replicating that feat, though.

A variation on that would be to buy an adapter socket and break the pin

off
of it rather than the processor but with FC-PGA celerons, up to 700Mhz,
going for under 25 bucks it's not much cheaper to replace in the event of

a
'boo-boo' and it adds the up front cost of the socket even without a
'boo-boo'. On the other hand, maybe one of the adapters has a jumper

inside
it to isolate the pin. I haven't checked for that since, as I mentioned, I
do the direct pin break.


Thanks! I think I'll go for the pin break. I don't think I'd go wrong
with it, and if I did, I'd prolly save a lot of stress & mess w/ mods by
just getting another Celly for under $25, like you say.


  #8  
Old January 12th 04, 04:05 AM
P2B
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



David Maynard wrote:
noob wrote:

"David Maynard" wrote in message
...

noob wrote:

"~misfit~" wrote in message
...


noob wrote:


I have a MSI MS-6368 mobo that I've installed a 566 celeron in.


Is that a coppermine celly?



However, the only options in the BIOS (Award V.6) are to increase FSB
to 68/34 or 75/37. How can I get this sucker to 100Mhz FSB?


By jumper perhaps? However, if it isn't a coppermine and there is no
facility for raising the vcore then you have no chance.



This is a fairly new BIOS (dated last summer), but I'm disappointed
in its overclocking options.

Anyone have any suggestions??


A lot depends on what revision your mobo is. That board came out in


several


different flavours ranging from 1.0 revision through to 5.x and they


vary

considerably in what they are capable of.



It's version 5.



Ok, just done some home-work, it has to be a coppermine celly as the


board

doesn't support earlier CPUs. MSI state that the board supports a
FSB of
66/100/133 so I'm assuming it'll be by jumper. If you don't have the


manual


and want to download it go he


http://www.msi.com.tw/program/suppor...ail.php?UID=21



No jumpers available. Only jumpers on the board are for clearing CMOS


and

enabling front audio ports.

In the BIOS, under Frequency/Voltage control, there are three options:
1. Autodetect DIMM/PCI clock (enabled or disabled)
2. Spread Spectrum (enabled or disabled)
3. CPU Host / PCI clock (default, 66/33, 68/34, 75/37)

MSI says it automatically detects CPU clock (which is 66Mhz).... maybe
that's why it isn't letting me go to 100Mhz FSB? Maybe MSI's allowed
overclock is limited to 14% or something weird like that....


This seems to be a common 'feature' of some BIOS versions. For some
reason
they get it into their head no one would want to encroach on the next
legitimate FSB so the only options they allow are 'up to' the next
'automatic' setting. In your case, whatever FSB choices they have



available

up to 100 MHz FSB, since that's the next 'legitimate' one.

My chaintechs do the same thing but, as irritating as it is, they at
least
have the FSB jumpers to over-ride the CPU.



Would raising the vCore change what MSI sees as the CPU clock or allows


for

overclocking? I can raise it to 1.75v by wrapping a coupla pins on the
processor.


Changing Vcore isn't going to make it 'think' it's a different
processor.
The BSel pins on the processor tell the motherboard what FSB to run
at and
that's what it will run at unless the BIOS has some option to over-ride



it.

What you need to do is isolate the Bsel0 pin (AJ33) so it goes high and
tells the motherboard it wants 100 MHz FSB.




Got it, thanks!! I found a web reference here
http://www.dualcpu.jp/fcpga-pin.html
There doesn't seem to be much material on the web about this.....



It's on old 'trick' that originated with the slot-1 celerons, except it
was easier to tape the connector pin than it is to isolate the same
thing on the PPGA and FC-PGA chip carrier. It's not 'common' now because
most third party 'modern' motherboards provide some way to do it, with
either the BIOS or jumpers, and I'm a bit surprised that the MSI doesn't.


I wonder if I should go ahead and raise the vCore while I'm at it?



It's likely you'll need a bit of a Vcore boost.

Odds are it'll run 112 MHz FSB too, assuming you have memory that'll do
it. Mine made it to 120Mhz FSB for 1020.

I'm running a spare Vantec Aeroflow on it, so it should have plenty of
cooling.

What do you recommend for isolating the pin? Any ideas?



Well, there are a number of 'ideas' that have been promulgated. One is
to 'paint' it with either nail polish or super glue. The one I remember
seeing was to use the bottom end of a ball-point pen, the guts removed,
fill it with the 'paint' and then slide it over the pin so it gets
coated. I've never tried that so lord knows if it works, or simply slops
goop all over everything. Another is to wallow out the CPU socket, so
there's more room, and then slide a real thin insulation, like stripped
from a wire wrap wire, over the processor pin before inserting it into
the socket. Another I saw was to remove the socket top, cut a small
piece of tape and insert it in the contact in the socket, and then put
the top back on. The idea with these is to leave the processor 'like
new' to save the warrantee and avoid a 'boo-boo' destroying it (although
if one 'boo-boos' on wallowing out the wrong socket pin you've ruined
the motherboard so it's not 'risk free' either).

I take the direct approach and simply break the appropriate pin off the
chip carrier but you're screwed if you go cross-eyed and break off the
wrong one, although P2B in here seems to have mastered some form of
voo-doo that enabled him to actually solder pins back on one of his.
Seems unlikely to me that mere mortals should count on replicating that
feat, though.


Once you've mastered the art of replacing chips whoose pins are only
0.15mm apart, soldering CPU pins is child's play - they are huge by
comparison :-) The right tools and a basic understanding of metalurgy
helps...

IMHO the best way to isolate CPU pins is to remove the socket top and
drill out the hole to 3/64" (1/16" will do if that's the smallest bit
available), then put 1/16" ID heatshrink tubing on the CPU pin and
shrink it with a hair dryer. 30 gauge wire-wrap insulation will also do
the job, but is harder to install on the pin as it's 'pre shrunk'.

The advantage of this approach is it's entirely reversible if you picked
the wrong pin or the mod doesn't have the desired effect.

A variation on that would be to buy an adapter socket and break the pin
off of it rather than the processor but with FC-PGA celerons, up to
700Mhz, going for under 25 bucks it's not much cheaper to replace in the
event of a 'boo-boo' and it adds the up front cost of the socket even
without a 'boo-boo'. On the other hand, maybe one of the adapters has a
jumper inside it to isolate the pin. I haven't checked for that since,
as I mentioned, I do the direct pin break.


Right now, I have it running at 8.5x75 for 638Mhz. I understand most


folks

are running these at 8.5x100 for 850Mhz. I'd like to know how to get


it

to run at 100Mhz with this MSI mobo.... maybe time for an email to MSI
(doubt they'll help, though).








  #9  
Old January 12th 04, 06:35 AM
David Maynard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

noob wrote:
"David Maynard" wrote in message
...

Got it, thanks!! I found a web reference here
http://www.dualcpu.jp/fcpga-pin.html
There doesn't seem to be much material on the web about this.....


It's on old 'trick' that originated with the slot-1 celerons, except it


was

easier to tape the connector pin than it is to isolate the same thing on
the PPGA and FC-PGA chip carrier. It's not 'common' now because most third
party 'modern' motherboards provide some way to do it, with either the


BIOS

or jumpers, and I'm a bit surprised that the MSI doesn't.



I wonder if I should go ahead and raise the vCore while I'm at it?


It's likely you'll need a bit of a Vcore boost.

Odds are it'll run 112 MHz FSB too, assuming you have memory that'll do


it.

Mine made it to 120Mhz FSB for 1020.



What voltage did you run yours at?


I don't remember now. The general 'feeling' in the overclock community is
that up to 15% over nominal is 'safe'.

Mine seems to have been one of the 'lucky' ones as some people had problems
getting them to even 900 (rare) but 850 was pretty much a 'can't miss'
proposition.


I'm running a spare Vantec Aeroflow on it, so it should have plenty of
cooling.

What do you recommend for isolating the pin? Any ideas?


Well, there are a number of 'ideas' that have been promulgated. One is to
'paint' it with either nail polish or super glue. The one I remember


seeing

was to use the bottom end of a ball-point pen, the guts removed, fill it
with the 'paint' and then slide it over the pin so it gets coated. I've
never tried that so lord knows if it works, or simply slops goop all over
everything. Another is to wallow out the CPU socket, so there's more room,
and then slide a real thin insulation, like stripped from a wire wrap


wire,

over the processor pin before inserting it into the socket. Another I saw
was to remove the socket top, cut a small piece of tape and insert it in
the contact in the socket, and then put the top back on. The idea with
these is to leave the processor 'like new' to save the warrantee and avoid
a 'boo-boo' destroying it (although if one 'boo-boos' on wallowing out the
wrong socket pin you've ruined the motherboard so it's not 'risk free'


either).

I take the direct approach and simply break the appropriate pin off the
chip carrier but you're screwed if you go cross-eyed and break off the
wrong one, although P2B in here seems to have mastered some form of


voo-doo

that enabled him to actually solder pins back on one of his. Seems


unlikely

to me that mere mortals should count on replicating that feat, though.

A variation on that would be to buy an adapter socket and break the pin


off

of it rather than the processor but with FC-PGA celerons, up to 700Mhz,
going for under 25 bucks it's not much cheaper to replace in the event of


a

'boo-boo' and it adds the up front cost of the socket even without a
'boo-boo'. On the other hand, maybe one of the adapters has a jumper


inside

it to isolate the pin. I haven't checked for that since, as I mentioned, I
do the direct pin break.



Thanks! I think I'll go for the pin break. I don't think I'd go wrong
with it, and if I did, I'd prolly save a lot of stress & mess w/ mods by
just getting another Celly for under $25, like you say.


That's pretty much my thinking, except for sweating bullets while I check
and recheck it 500 times.



  #10  
Old January 12th 04, 08:46 AM
~misfit~
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David Maynard wrote:

I take the direct approach and simply break the appropriate pin off
the
chip carrier but you're screwed if you go cross-eyed and break off the
wrong one, although P2B in here seems to have mastered some form of
voo-doo that enabled him to actually solder pins back on one of his.
Seems unlikely
to me that mere mortals should count on replicating that feat, though.


Hey! That was me who managed to solder a pin back on a CPU (Celly 600).
Unless P2B has done it as well. :-)
--
~misfit~


 




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